• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

No tables no buddy breathing?

Discussion in 'SSI: Scuba Schools International' started by SIUegyptiandiver, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. jscott099

    jscott099 Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Branford, FL
    427
    17
    0
    There is an ongoing thread about table vs computer. I'll chime in though: A comment heard often in this battle is that somehow if you learn computers you do not learn any deco theory. Or, if you don't learn tables then you don't learn theory. I teach my students all the basics of theory. But, they don't have to know how to use a table to do it. Depth, NDL, BT, SI, etc are all just numbers. What does it matter whether you use a computer to tell you what they are or manually plug them in on a table and paper. The end result and need to know are the same.

    Is it not fortunate that we also don't require users of home computers to know the binary number system to make use of them?
     
  2. SIUegyptiandiver

    SIUegyptiandiver Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Southern Illinois
    69
    12
    8
    Is it not fortunate that we also don't require users of home computers to know the binary number system to make use of them?[/QUOTE]

    All good, valid points. As long as students get training in at least basic dive physiology, N2 absorption and dissipation, the importance of keeping track of BT, SI, etc I agree with you.

    One quick counter point to the above quote, though: We dont ask ANYONE (thank god) to understand the multiple mathematical algorithms that go into how the dive puter calculates BT, No-DC Limits or required SI. We only hope that they do understand WHY the computer is giving them those values and how to interpret them.
     
  3. Stujiro

    Stujiro Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Chicago
    36
    1
    0
    We don't ask anyone to understand the math behind creating the tables either.
     
  4. DeusVerto

    DeusVerto Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Katy, Texas
    122
    0
    16
    Not to be a smart-alec, but I sometimes wonder if we put enough emphasis into making sure people KNOW HOW TO SWIM. That, coupled with breath control (dry snorkels be damned) and controlling the panic reflex are the main fundamentals upon which all other skills are based.
     
  5. tstormdiver

    tstormdiver Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Kentucky
    6,171
    1,126
    113
    DV, I agree with you on the last 2 points completely, but on knowing how to swim,.... I do not. Being very comfortable in the water, yes 100%. In diving, there is actually very little true swimming done. I understand that the 2 usually go hand in hand, but not always. I've seen several excellent divers that are terrible swimmers, but are still very comfy in, under & around the water. I'm sure there are some that would disagree to the ends of the earth with me, but comfort in & under the water is paramount to being a good swimmer, to make a successful diver.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2010
  6. Codiak

    Codiak Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Beaver Lake, Nebraska
    348
    16
    0
    Tables or Computers, they are just tools. Knowing how to use them, and DOING so, is the key.

    SDI has a Computer only Nitrox class where tables are avoided but the theories are throughly covered.

    I'd be worried if I ever see a sitrep where students are told "Just do what the machine says".

    Students in these classes still have to understand NDL, RT etc and have to plan accordingly the computers hopefully make the process less error prone and faster. And yes this is covered in standards.

    As for failing computers, dive with two or just abort the dive on failure and wait 24hours to resume diving... rules need to match the tools.
     
  7. DeusVerto

    DeusVerto Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Katy, Texas
    122
    0
    16
    Sure, great Australian crawl technique is virtually useless while diving. Perhaps "knowing how to swim" infers some ability to propel yourself by some means, inclusive of being "comfy" around the water. Losing a fin and swimming 100 meters back to the boat is not much fun even when you know how. Just saying. :)
     
  8. jpro

    jpro Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    21
    0
    0
    I completed my OW in July of this year. Tables were covered in the text (not relegated to and appendix) and the course, and were part of my test. Computers were described, but we did not lay hand on one even during our qualifying dives. I don't have my manual at hand to check the publication date - perhaps there's a newer version my dive shop didn't have yet...?
     
  9. christopherm

    christopherm Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Montgomery, Alabama
    11
    0
    0
    I thought SSI required buddy breathing. But the question is - "is buddy breathing a required skill". I am fairly new to scuba diving - about a year. About a month ago on a deep dive I saw buddy breathing going on. We were doing a deep dive in rough seas. A father and son went down - plenty of air. The father was very experienced and used a lot less air than most of us. Well things happened - nothing major. His son was a little nervous (sucked up more air than normal), the rough seas, and a cluster of people being battered on the safety stop line. The son was getting nervous. Instead of jumping the line the father let the son breathe some of his air. This gave the son an extra cusion and the confidence to calm down. It also gave the father the control he needed to manage his son. The boy didn't need the air because he ran out but it helped his dive. I believe in knowing how to buddy breathe.
     
  10. tstormdiver

    tstormdiver Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Kentucky
    6,171
    1,126
    113
    Perhaps a little mix up in teminology-
    Buddy breathing (passing 1 2nd stage regulator back & forth between 2 divers) is not required, only optional. Alternate air sharing (using an alternate air source- octo, integrated air source or such & a primary regulator, between 2 divers) is required.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2010

Share This Page