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Ocean Acidification -- can you see it happening?

Discussion in 'Ocean Conservation' started by WeRtheOcean, Sep 28, 2019.

  1. WeRtheOcean

    WeRtheOcean Nassau Grouper

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    Climate change is one of the big environmental issues -- I do believe it will turn out to be the biggest crisis of the 21st century. One of the ramifications of global climate change is ocean acidification, which, if what I have been reading is correct, could devastate the entire oceanic ecosystem. Worst-case scenario is the possibility of all multicellular ocean life disappearing. My question is: is this phenomenon something you can see visually? When you dive, can you observe visible signs of ocean acidification? What does it look like?
     
  2. happy-diver

    happy-diver Skindiver Just feelin it ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: same ocean as you
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    Yeah mate I dive with whales almost every winter weekend
    and if we brought back wailing that's a heck of a lot of piss
     
    HKGuns likes this.
  3. HKGuns

    HKGuns Barracuda

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Merica
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    I will start by saying I’m all for conservation and preserving nature.

    BUT, Climate Change, global warming, global cooling, the next Ice age, whatever they are calling it now is a scam designed to control you and give you yet another reason to worry about crap that will eventually separate you from your money and personal Liberty.

    Ask yourself how often the 5 day weather forecast is accurate? Not often.

    Ask yourself how many predictions have proven accurate? None.

    Ask yourself this, why is there always some crisis that requires something from you?

    Ask yourself this, why are hurricanes suddenly the fault of climate change? Spanish Galleons were lost in Hurricanes hundreds of years ago.

    There are far too many variables in play that are too poorly understood for their “science” to be real.

    Climate change is a cult. Yes, label me a denier. The climate changes daily and there is nothing we can do to change that fact of nature.

    I’m fairly certain this post will be reported by one of the cult members and end up in the dust bin of SB.
     
  4. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

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    Location: Florida
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    You can't "see it" unless you're actually researching it, usually. There are many published articles that measure ocean acidification's effects on skeletal calcification of various species, but it's not something that one can for example take a group of schoolkids out to the beach and point to.

    I recommend going to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program site. It has a lot of stuff to read and look at.
    OAP Home
     
    Seaweed Doc likes this.
  5. Eric Sedletzky

    Eric Sedletzky Great White

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Santa Rosa, CA
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    What does ocean acidification look like? I have no idea therefore I can’t tell you. I’ve heard of it on the East Coast. Manufacturing plants producing large quantities of acrid toxic gases and that exhaust going up into the clouds then when it rains the water is acidic and kills stuff on the ground. A lot of this has been cleaned up along with environmental regulations prohibiting toxic PCB’s from being created and set free.
    China I hear is the biggest producer of pollution now and all that stuff makes it over the Pacific within a few weeks or less. The pollution on the west coast isn’t from us, it’s them.
    I guess that's the price we pay for cheap products at Wal Mart and Target.
     
  6. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
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    The primary polluting agent is increased atmospheric carbon dioxide, which when dissolved in seawater tends to end up dumping a lot of excess ionic hydrogen into the water column.
    upload_2019-9-28_19-54-55.png
    It's the same carbonic acid buffering system used in your cells. Except that you can control your internal CO2 and stave off acidosis.
     
    Seaweed Doc likes this.
  7. Dan

    Dan Orca

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
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    7.7 billion people are just too many for the earth to support. We are consuming O2 and producing CO2 in every breath. We are burning off the fossil fuel and producing more CO2 as by-product, wiping out the O2 producing forest for farming O2 consuming and CO2 producing animals.
     
    falcon125 likes this.
  8. Ministryofgiraffes

    Ministryofgiraffes Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Toronto
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    This is is f@cking gold :):):popcorn::banghead::yeahbaby:
     
    FreeFlyFreak and aviator8 like this.
  9. ScubaRob0311

    ScubaRob0311 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: United States
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    I don't know much but can probably point you in the right direction! Doubt you can see acidification itself but could probably see the effects..... Living matter dieing off.
    If you want to learn what it might look at then look into the Adirondacks in NYS. The lakes there are finally starting to recover from acid rains making lakes acidic. Also pretty sure that effected wildlife including bald eagles resulting in thinner shells on eggs.
     
  10. Rusty Shackleford

    Rusty Shackleford Barracuda

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Port Canaveral Florida
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    There is too much buffering capacity in the ocean. The oceans also sit on gigatons of carbonate rocks such as limestone and dolomite.
     

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