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Padi rescue Diver Swim requirements??

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by mavjax, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. dweeb

    dweeb Manta Ray

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    it made the albums sound better, too.
     
  2. dweeb

    dweeb Manta Ray

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    And if one is not in shape, adrenaline can be just the thing to bring on the heart attack.

    What I meant to say before is, when a real rescue comes, you'll find yourself juggling 5 tasks, rather than the 3 in class. Just the way of the world.

    I don't intend to, but I'm definitely not one to soften the message. You haven't melted - maybe that's a point to remember when you feel anxious, since some people here think I'm too harsh for mere mortals to handle.

    New and you don't know what to expect - isn't that the nature of all 'adventure?' - of exciting new discoveries?
    Yes, it is all TOO normal for humans to be anxious in dealing with new and different experiences. Such anxiety about new things has given us such things as racism. It may be normal, but that doesn't make it healthy. Anxiety just eats you from the inside - it's stress without purpose.


    It makes ME wonder why I didn't have a good time when so many others do, and what I did wrong (wrong suit) and prompts me to seek out a way to correct it, but once I've seen to that, I'm not anxious. It was unpleasant before, but I know why, and I've taken appropriate corrective measures. Unless, of course, you didn't take the appropriate measures, which is a whole different issue.

    By the way,based on this information, your issue is not with lakes, but with cold water. There are places that the ocean is cold, and lakes which are warm, so LAKE diving wasn't the issue. This is what I meant about learning more - gaining the background necessary to accurately describe what the problem is - cold water rather than fresh water.

    It wouldn't make me want to know more about that. I just look at the fact that PADI's member numbers are running in the mid 6 figures. If all those people could do it, I figure it can't be all that much.
     
  3. underwater daphne

    underwater daphne Solo Diver

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    i guess we just have different opinions. some of your points seem good for me, some not at all. i think you're generalising too much or maybe you think everyone is like you.
    but let's not get into that. :) thanks for your thoughts.
     
  4. kherron

    kherron Guest

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    I'm feeling rather anxious now... when I took my first OW class, I still had 78RPM records in my collection and a record player with nickels on the tone arm to prevent skipping. I didn't know what a turntable was until a couple of years later, but my roommates didn't know 78s existed outside the Smithsonian; so I guess it all worked out. Oh, I guess I'm feeling ancient, not anxious. I'm not trying to ruffle feathers, but... I think that PADI is fantastic for getting folks into the sport, but I wonder at "dumbing down" advanced class material or having a course that most people who are out-of-shape desk jockeys (such as myself) can pass without some moderate physical conditioning. I have pondered this approach often as I reach for another smoke and think,”Is the cert that I'm earning likely to give a buddy, or group, a false sense of security?" On the other hand, I believe that any training properly given is better than none. I was extremely anxious when I enrolled in my recent OW class because the OW cert that I earned in 1981 was tough and I almost didn't make it. The class was included in my college tuition as an optional part of the PE reqs. but I couldn't afford the $25 cert fee after the course and $25 could buy a lot of potatoes and beans. This class was very mentally and physically challenging. So much so, that I think the instructors were insuring that they had some amusing stories to tell over the after-school pitchers. ("Hey, did you see how much water ol' Bob choked up after his fifth ditch and don? Yeah, but I made him do it again because his snorkel was backwards.")



    Looking back on my OW class in 2003, most of my difficulty was with the memories of THE 1981 CIRCUIT. ditch, lap under water, lap, don, free-flow milk jug breathing for 2 minutes, ditch, lap, buddy breathe lap (no octo), don, etc. That thing was meant to either break you or turn into a fish. And then there were the good ol' Navy tables and all that ciphering done without a calculator... But once I started the new class and found that the requirements had become less trying, my anxieties were reduced to "Can I do this in front of my teenage daughter without embarrassment." Anxiety is what you allow it to be. Do not allow your fear(s) of the unknown (or known but uncomfortable) destroy your chance to learn, grow and help others. And once you've finished learning and growing, you can gritch at the younguns.

     
  5. dweeb

    dweeb Manta Ray

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    It's not opinion, it's statistical reality.
    Look at all the instructors and DM's out there. They are a pretty representative cross section of society, including some fat slobs and idiots. Unless you feel you are significantly less fit or competent than, say, the 20th percentile pro certed person (and that's a pretty sad state which I doubt you are in) what reason for concern is there?
    What I'm getting at is your perception of your own capabilities seems unrealistically low. It's called learned helplessness - when one believes that relatively easy things, which normal people achieve every day, might reasonably be beyond one's reach. It seems to be the standard operating mode in our society and it's something you'll always be better off without.
     
  6. dweeb

    dweeb Manta Ray

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    Bingo!
     
  7. dfenderman

    dfenderman Garibaldi

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    Anyone got a good basic training regimen to prepare for rescue diver? I am thinking of going for if this summer.
     
  8. BKP

    BKP Great White

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    It's not that physical.

    It has a few high adrenalin moments, such as surface retrieval of a panicked diver, timed pattern search for a down diver, board carries of the injured... However, it isn't an extraordinarily high physical certification.

    Make sure you understand procedural steps... pay attention... and enjoy the class. This was my favorite, and most practical cert class.
     
  9. dfenderman

    dfenderman Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Oregon
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    Alright, thanks. I am looking forward to it.
     

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