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Panic and Tech Diving

Discussion in 'Technical Diving Specialties' started by Cave Diver, Jul 10, 2010.

  1. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
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    Yes to a degree

    Its been a part of every tech & cave class I've been in (2 each)

    Mine all seemed to: Chris LM, Danny R, Joe T, and Andrew G

    Near panic once or twice, deep breathing (as paradoxical as that always seems at the time) and rationalization are about all I fell back on at the exact moment. Stop, breathe, think kinda thing.
     
  2. ucfdiver

    ucfdiver DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Orlando, FL
    3,338
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    I would slap myself in the face to wake up, this won't ever happen in real life, and if it did, maybe you just need to realize that you're SOL.
     
  3. TSandM

    TSandM Missed and loved by many. Rest in Peace ScubaBoard Supporter

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    I was actually talking to a recent tech class graduate about training dives last night. He was recounting a situation in his class where two divers had had their left posts rolled off without their knowledge. BOTH of them donated gas, went to their backups, found them empty, and immediately signaled OOA.

    An instructor for the same agency pulled that on me in my first dive with him, and I donated, put the backup in my mouth. found it dry, and had a brief moment of surprise -- then the fact that my OOG buddy was breathing happily off my primary reg told me what had happened.

    Neither I nor the team whose story I heard had ever had that failure thrown at them before. How do you teach somebody to slow down, think, and choose the rational response? I do believe some of it is related to personality.
     
  4. DiverLaura

    DiverLaura Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: From the edge of the deep green sea
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    experience. discussions. learn from others. learn by diving. extrapolate. learn your gear inside and out. learn your diving environment inside and out. learn yourself inside and out. Did I mention learn your gear? love you gear, practice in it, dive in it so much it's a second skin, become one with it, that way if you have to reach back and turn on a rolloff, or go on bailout (or a stage), it's just second nature, a non-issue. as long as you have a reg that works and a tank that has gas in it you are okay... You may have switch **** out a bit, have your buddy help get things sorted, but as long as you have a way to get breathable gas to your lungs, you have time to sort other stuff out if you keep your wits about you.

    The things Leon talked to us about in my CCR class were likely places i'll never go and/or never be faced with. BUT, now i've actually heard of them, i have some answers in my arsenal to help solve lesser problems.

    The bottom line is, as long as you are breathing, you have time to sort stuff out as long as you slow it down, get control of yourself and think. If that is reinforced again and again and again, hopefully it sticks.

    this could also be a place where the training methods of the old days, where we DID turn peoples air off unexpectedly was actually helpful. You can either signal OOG, or reach back and check your valve. if you had a PITA buddy who was into hazing, usually the first thing you learned to do was check your valve. same with no mask drills... "oops, your mask is gone" (as you are videoing the wolf eel or something else non-training related)
     
  5. Dive-aholic

    Dive-aholic Dive Shop

    # of Dives:
    Location: North Florida - Marianna area
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    It's a matter of the way you set it up. I do lost buddy unscripted in Intro and never leave the students unattended. It's actually quite easy.
     
  6. DiverLaura

    DiverLaura Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: From the edge of the deep green sea
    848
    142
    43
    lol.. cave instructors seem adept at perfecting the art of ninja :wink:
     
  7. Dive-aholic

    Dive-aholic Dive Shop

    # of Dives:
    Location: North Florida - Marianna area
    8,872
    1,004
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    :d :d :d :d :d
     
  8. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
    10,173
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    I'm not defending they way they've setup the course(s) just telling you the GUE training council's general thoughts - at least the way they were reiterated to me a few years ago. My Cave1 was 4 yrs ago and was a class of 2 students so maybe that shaped how lost buddy proceedures were taught.
     
  9. packman

    packman Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: southeast of disorder
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    In both my basic and full cave classes, the instructor just disappeared on us. One minute there...the next, "sonuva...where did she go?"
     
  10. LiteHedded

    LiteHedded Great White

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    my course was the same way except mine was uphill both ways in the snow!
     

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