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Photo kind etiquette

Discussion in 'Underwater Photography' started by myshadeofred, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. myshadeofred

    myshadeofred Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Virginia
    110
    71
    28
    Good afternoon! So one of my big issues, whether small or big boat, but for those folks who hog the photo. I recently went diving in NC, on a small boat with 6 divers. I went for the sharks...there happen to be this one diver who when a shark was spotted did her whole follow with a gopro right until she couldn't follow any more.

    Then I found a shark from a distance and wanted to take my photos with my little camera (not gopro) but to no avail she invaded the shark with her gopro and continued to follow it so that 80% of my photos have her in it.

    I find this a bit intrusive. Get your photo and go. Especially if you didn't see it first.

    I try to definitely not hot a good photo op...and listen folks...i don't need you and your gopro in my shot.

    Lastly, it's very stalkerish to do this and I think a bit hazing of the marine life. So pay attention. Respect the ocean and its residents.

    Done ranting.
     
  2. Schwob

    Schwob Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Illinois
    1,719
    905
    113
    It may not be a scientifically proven fact that strapping a scuba tank on ones back does not really improve ones capacity for consideration of others, be those others human or not... ... but it sure appears as if in fact, on average no improvement occurs and often the opposite appears to be the norm... amd quite more so with cameras of any sort involved...
     
    Zef, Wingy, Griffo and 1 other person like this.
  3. outofofficebrb

    outofofficebrb HARRO HUNNAYYY

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: San Francisco, California
    2,710
    1,966
    113
    Ugh....I have come across this before.........Except it was an entire boat of people doing this in Thailand. Right, @WetPup? :wink: Unfortunately, the diver(s) wasn't/weren't from our boat, but had they been, I would have spoken up to the guide/cruise director/boat staff and conveyed my concerns. Not only is it not great for the wildlife, but it is really rude for the other guests to not be able to get an opportunity to observe, spend time with, or photograph it for themselves. I am not an antagonistic person by nature, but I know that if I tried to talk to the person directly, I might end up in a situation that is less than desirable because of how upset I might become speaking about it, or how upset they might become, and a quarrel might ensue.

    I am hoping that in your case, that it was a lack of self awareness, and maybe they got excited and don't realize it, but I also know that in many cases, that is not the case and they are just selfish or rude.
     
  4. myshadeofred

    myshadeofred Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Virginia
    110
    71
    28

    Hi, normally I have more patience with a novice diver because they are just learning...but she bragged about her diving and her tech diving...so i didn't engage. She just annoyed me. She knows about what she does because she has to show everyone the video on the boat. Either way, I guess I could have said something in a kind manner...But I think she knows she does it. My dive group from HI were all so polite...when we saw something cool we shared it. I think it should be talked about more since everyone now thinks they are photographers.
     
  5. outofofficebrb

    outofofficebrb HARRO HUNNAYYY

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: San Francisco, California
    2,710
    1,966
    113
    We could start a whole new thread just based on that sentence alone...keyword: bragging. :confused::tired:
     
    Schwob and myshadeofred like this.
  6. Lorenzoid

    Lorenzoid idling in neutral buoyancy

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Atlanta, USA
    8,876
    5,322
    113
    And remember, you photographers, the potential problem isn't limited to one photographer interfering with a shot that another would like to take, but also a photographer interfering with the ability of those of us who don't carry cameras to observe the marine life behaving naturally.

    Although I'm not a photographer, I try to make the etiquette mutual by, for example, moving in to observe something, and then backing out of the way after I have taken a reasonable look, because I know there are others--no doubt mostly photographers--waiting to see it.

    And yeah, there have been a few threads on this.
     
    Zef, Wingy, chillyinCanada and 6 others like this.
  7. myshadeofred

    myshadeofred Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Virginia
    110
    71
    28
    I have a friend I dive with that tells me to put the camera down...and I appreciate the moments and the memories are so much more vivid than of those where Im looking at screen.
     
  8. outofofficebrb

    outofofficebrb HARRO HUNNAYYY

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: San Francisco, California
    2,710
    1,966
    113
    I generally trail behind to view critters for this reason. I like to give people who are not photographing anything, or are quick shooters (GoPros, action cams, etc.) a go at it first. If there is someone behind me, I make sure to just take a couple shots, then allow them to look, then will go back and try again if I feel like the shot is not the one I want. That also gives me time to review and tweak the settings before I go back in again. I feel like that is efficient and a good use of time, I feel less rushed, and I minimize the possibility of someone being annoyed at me.
     
    Joneill and Lorenzoid like this.
  9. davehicks

    davehicks Barracuda

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Seattle
    308
    186
    43
    This is a complicated topic, and the etiquette really depends on the nature and plan for the dive group.

    Situation 1: If you are diving in an organized, DiveGuide led group then every person including the photographer should take their turn, take a few shots within 10-20 seconds and move on. Respect the group and share.

    Situation 2: Not a DiveGuide led group, but individuals or buddy pairs on their own. It's a big ocean and if you don't like being near a photographer then go somewhere else. A photographer who Spots their Own Subject and decides to shoot is is totally free and justified to sit on that subject for as long as they need to. If they move on then go in and take a look too, but don't feel entitled to barge in. (Yes, it is necessary to respect the wildlife and not abuse it but sharing is not required)

    Neither of these situations works well if one or both parties act like an aggressive a%#hole. Be respectful of not chasing or hogging the wildlife or landmarks, but don't feel entitled to insert your self into every situation you come across that a photographer is focused on.
     
  10. Lorenzoid

    Lorenzoid idling in neutral buoyancy

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Atlanta, USA
    8,876
    5,322
    113
    @davehicks , in Situation 1, are you assuming it is the dive guide who spotted the creature? Maybe I'm not understanding exactly what you mean, but often in a group where there is a dive guide it is one of the divers, not the dive guide, who spots something. I have always assumed that on these kinds of dives the etiquette is that if you spot something, you look at it (or photograph it) and encourage others to come take turns looking at it (or photographing it), and the others in the group will do the same if they find something. It's a group dive, so we share what we find to the extent we can. I expect a photographer will take more time than a non-photographer when it's his turn (or even if he's the first), and that big semi-pro rigs will take more time than GoPros and point-and-shoots, etc., so as a non-photographer I try to be patient, but I believe each of us should take an amount of time that is reasonable for our individual circumstances.
     
    outofofficebrb likes this.

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