• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Plastic recycling

Discussion in 'Non-Diving Related Stuff' started by ggunn, May 21, 2019.

  1. Dan G

    Dan G Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Colorado
    943
    634
    93
     
  2. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas High Plains
    47,829
    3,862
    113
    Almost all rivers go to the sea.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  3. El Graduado

    El Graduado Manta Ray

    522
    915
    93
    I don't think the Colorado River makes it all the way to the sea anymore...
     
  4. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas High Plains
    47,829
    3,862
    113
    Nor does the Rio Grande and some others - usually. Debris in those dying rivers build up at the dead end until a big storm hits, sending the raft on. Hurricanes are powerful influences.
     
  5. Chavodel8en

    Chavodel8en Barracuda

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Oakland, CA
    432
    209
    43
    As someone wrote, they all either end up in a landfill OR the sea.

    I know we all love the ocean, but the earth also could use less pollution.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  6. deepsea21

    deepsea21 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location:
    898
    734
    93
    The trash in the Colorado river just makes its eventual way to the next hydroelectric dam where it accumulates on the bottom of the dam or floats into the entry points where larger pieces are filtered out and the rest that is small enough makes it to the turbines where some will be further torn apart into smaller pieces and upon its impact on the spillways and grinding its way on down the river will be further fragmented. Pan for gold in the Colorado river and see how many plastic fragments you find your pan. You are correct, not much water makes it to sea from the Colorado river anymore but the trash it carries and is ground up ends up somewhere... All plastic ends up somewhere.

    I'm surprised to read such a thing from you Ron. I could probably launch WWIII with the number of guns I own. Living in Colorado I assume you could be a hunter. Every hunter knows that every bullet fired that doesn't hit its intended target ends up somewhere... "Watch your background".

    As far as placing one's plastic trash in the recycling bin goes and thinking you are doing some good... That is 100% BS. Today, virtually none of the plastic trash one may place in a recycling bin is recycled because it costs more to recycle than it costs to produce new. This is the reality and China recently decided they no longer cared to be the world's dumping ground for plastic trash. They took it for years but it wasn't recycled, it piled up everywhere.

    Where Will Your Plastic Trash Go Now That China Doesn't Want It?
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  7. ljpm

    ljpm Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Ottawa, Canada
    336
    116
    43
  8. Schwob

    Schwob Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Illinois
    1,658
    850
    113
    The vast majority of the plastic we produced and that went somewhere, never made it into the ocean yet. Unless it is biodegradable, was incinerated, even if it was recycled, if you give it enough time it will yet make it into the ocean. Even if we stopped producing plastics tomorrow or completely closed the re-use, recycle or transform to energy cycle tomorrow, the amount of plastic being „somewhere“ and just waiting to get in the ocean is way more than what currently is in the ocean. Given enough time, even proper landfills may end up in the ocean... some day...
     
    RyanT, deepsea21 and chillyinCanada like this.
  9. deepsea21

    deepsea21 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location:
    898
    734
    93
  10. spc751

    spc751 DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: BC Canada
    398
    82
    28

Share This Page