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Possible southern reef closure

Discussion in 'Cozumel' started by gopbroek, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. flyboy08

    flyboy08 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: NYC
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    I’ve stayed next door at the Occidental numerous times without ever seeing the slightest bit of sewage in the water we often hang out in. They have a humongous treatment plant on site. I assume their sister site, Iberostar has same.
     
  2. PKoski1052

    PKoski1052 Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Minnesota
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    Agreed, and please take note when dives " up North " are looked at as a fix. I have quite a few dives " up North " and the waters are very treacherous to say the least. Definitely not a place for novice divers and a move to do more diving " up North" will lead to lost divers and further bad press. For those of you who have dove Barracuda etc. please chime in.
     
  3. Christi

    Christi PADI MSDT/Dive op owner ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Cozumel, MX
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    It has come to my attention that the e-mail I provided above was wrong - LOL - I have corrected it. E-mails should go to info@bluextseadiving.com
     
  4. knucklebusted

    knucklebusted Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Vette City, USA (Bowling Green, KY)
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    I agreed with you until you went political. That has no place in this thread.
     
  5. Brules

    Brules Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Oklahoma City
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    Agreed.

    As to the hotels and waste handling, even with a large waste treatment plant at the OG - where does that "brown" water go? What about all the houses and hotels south of town with no treatment ability?

    I have heard repeatedly they inject it (brown water and raw sewage) into the ground, which would then filter out into the ocean as the whole island is filled with underground tunnels and rivers that dump into the reef. Not sure if true but it is a subject not many locals want to discuss in my 25+ years of visiting and asking quite often.

    In addition -it is suspicious that the bacteria problem is both in Miami and in Coz - the most commonly shared thing between Fl and Coz is = cruise ships? Makes you wonder......and they DEF dump brown water into the ocean by the tooooons.
     
    knucklebusted likes this.
  6. deepsea21

    deepsea21 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Virginia Beach, VA USA
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    Based on how this disease has spread I think we can probably blame large ships that utilize ballast water for its rapid spread but the ships are not the cause of the disease. If it weren't spread quickly by ships' dumping infected ballast water in uninfected areas it would still spread on its own just as the lion fish infestation did. No one transported and dumped 1000 lion fish at each island in the Caribbean - they moved on their own carried by the currents just as this waterborne disease is carried but if someone did dump 1000 lions at every island they would have spread that much faster.

    The reality is this disease has reached Cozumel and it is now creeping down into Belize. In time it will most likely spread throughout the entire Caribbean and throughout the globe (lion fish are now showing up in Europe). Scientists are attempting treatments on individual infected corals when the disease is identified to try and halt the spread on that specific piece of coral but that doesn't mean that coral can't become infected in another place at a later date as the disease is waterborne. With all the coral in the reefs, the concept of treating every individual piece that becomes infected throughout the Caribbean is futile... Like trying to extinguish a forest fire with a garden hose (or trying spear every lion fish in the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico and up the east coast of the USA).

    Bottom line, the world is changing and the primary reason is human overpopulation. Cut the population in 1/2 back to where it was in 1970's and lots of these problems would probably vanish but that isn't going to happen and the population is only going to keep increasing. In a way this is kind of coral superbug and it is going to kill a lot of coral. In time, humanity is going to face another superbug that is going to kill a lot of the global population. The world's top scientists have concluded in the end it's going to be the microscopic things that cull our population, not a meteor impact, gamma ray burst, or some other extraterrestrial event. Everyone knows bacteria and viruses thrive in polluted environments and the earth is only going to get more polluted as the population continues to increase. So drink from paper straws, use fabric grocery bags that you fill with products in plastic packaging, drive a hybrid or electric car that is charged with fossil fuel generated electricity and continue your self delusion that you making a difference that is going to change the ultimate outcome. As another posted, 99.9% of everything that has ever lived on earth is now extinct for all sorts of reasons but the world is still here and continues to change/evolve.
     
  7. scubadada

    scubadada Diver Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Philadelphia and Boynton Beach
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    That is very fatalistic philosophy, are you suggesting that no one should take an action that might reverse the course we are on?
     
  8. ggunn

    ggunn ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Austin, TX, USA
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    Have you any idea what this re-evaluation will result in, given the alternatives? It would be ironic if the reef suddenly got a lot healthier during the closure and it resulted in the reefs being closed to divers permanently.
     
  9. ggunn

    ggunn ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Austin, TX, USA
    9,841
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    Right on. Saving the planet isn't the point; the planet will do just fine with or without us. Whether conditions will remain conducive to human survival is another thing altogether.
     
    deepsea21 likes this.
  10. deepsea21

    deepsea21 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Virginia Beach, VA USA
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    It is indeed troubling. I am saying that one can take action but they should do so knowing they are not going to change the ultimate outcome.
     

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