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Preserve access to wrecks. Write your reps and government officials.

Discussion in 'SEI Diving' started by Jim Lapenta, Apr 8, 2014.

  1. Jim Lapenta

    Jim Lapenta Dive Shop

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Canonsburg, Pa
    16,863
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    Below are the important government agencies that you should contact in addition to your members of Congress.
    Go to www.house.gov and click on the appropriate name and email them. If you can call their offices in Washington and your state. Make your voice heard regarding the proposed rule changes on diving wrecks in US waters from this action:


    Guidelines for Permitting Archaeological Investigations and other Activities Directed at Sunken Military Craft and Terrestrial Military Craft Under the Jurisdiction of the Department of the Navy
    Proposed Rule: 37 CFR Part 767 Comments due March 7, 2014
    Federal Register Volume79, Number 3, Monday, January 6, 2014
    No. USN-2011-0016. RIN 0703-AA90. FR DOC # 2013-31068


    Request that the named individuals below contact the Department of the Navy and demand that they involve the sport diving industry in revision of the published language.

    Request a re-proposal of the rule.

    A Congressional Hearing would help gather additional comments. An economic analysis under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act will show that these regulations will negatively impact about 3 million sport divers and an industry that contributes about $11 billion to the US GDP.

    One thousand divers can create 30 full-time equivalent jobs. If you are willing and able, offer to meet and speak with your elected officials and participate in any discussion or hearings on the matter.

    The language is vague and open to diverse interpretations. We are independent of the archaeological community and the commercial salvage community. We need much clearer language to understand which vessels are covered and what activities are prohibited.

    The proposed action is unwarranted and the U.S. Navy has proposed regulations that would require a permit to dive on or explore any shipwreck, anywhere in the world which at any time in its past was affiliated with the Navy, even if it was only under charter to the Navy at some time during its career.

    One of the more ridiculous reasons mentioned is the possibility of running across classified materials or designs in these vessels. On a 75 year old wreck whose plans can be found by any member of the public in the national archives, on line, or by purchasing a good quality model from a hobby shop!

    Even if it was only transporting cargo that might possibly have been used by the Navy. These regulations would apply not only to diving, but to fishing, anchoring, and any form of observation - direct or remote - including submersible and drop-camera photography. Absolute and total control would be exercised by a handful of non Naval personnel who work at the Naval Historical Center.

    The senior staff of the NHC consists of approximately five individuals. These individuals seem to be focused on global shipwreck control that could forever change or even eliminate some aspects of wreck-diving as we know it.

    Should the NHC succeed, everyone - recreational divers, charter boat operators, commercial and non-commercial anglers, archaeologists, and citizens of other nations - will have to petition the NHC for a written permit to conduct any kind of activity on a shipwreck which they deem falls under their jurisdiction. And we all are familiar with how fast and how efficient the government is at such things.

    We cannot allow this to happen. Many of these wrecks are deteriorating and being lost to history. Sport and technical divers often bring back images and stories that are the only glimpse into these wrecks for the majority of people. Limiting or refusing access will only result in the loss of these ships to time and rust. The NHC is not diving, preserving, or even documenting many of these wrecks and if not for sport divers the location of numerous ones would be unknown. Everyone realizes the importance of preserving war graves. But many of these do not fall under such classifications.

    The Small Business Administration
    Subject: An economic analysis under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act will show that these regulations will negatively impact about 3 million sport divers and an industry that contributes about $11 billion to the US GDP. One thousand divers can create 30 full-time equivalent jobs. We need much clearer language to understand which sunken vessels are covered and what activities are prohibited.

    Dr. Winslow Sargent
    Winslow.sargent@sba.gov
    Mr. Charles Maresca
    Charles.maresa@sba.gov

    The Office of Management and Budget
    Subject: An economic analysis under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act will show that these regulations will negatively impact about 3 million sport divers and an industry that contributes about $11 billion to the US GDP. One thousand divers can create 30 full-time equivalent jobs. We need much clearer language to understand which sunken vessels are covered and what activities are prohibited.

    Director Sylvia Mathews Burwell
    Oira_submission@omb.gov

    Secretary of the Navy
    Subject: No. USN-2011-0016 Sunken Vessels I request that the Navy involve the sport diving industry in revision of the published language. I request a re-proposal of the rule. A Congressional Hearing would help gather additional comments. An economic analysis under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act should be completed.

    Secretary Ray Mabus
    http://www.navy.mil/submit/contacts.asp
    Select US Navy- Specific Programs

    U.S. Department of Commerce
    Subject: An economic analysis under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act will show that these regulations will negatively impact about 3 million sport divers and an industry that contributes about $11 billion to the US GDP. One thousand divers can create 30 full-time equivalent jobs. We need much clearer language to understand which sunken vessels are covered and what activities are prohibited.

    Secretary Penny Pritzker:
    TheSec@doc.gov

    Department of the Interior
    Subject: Proposed Navy regulations will negatively impact about 3 million sport divers and an industry that contributes about $11 billion to the US GDP. One thousand divers can create 30 full-time equivalent jobs. We need much clearer language to understand which sunken vessels are covered and what activities are prohibited.

    Secretary Sally Jewell
    E-Mail: feedback@ios.doi.gov

    Department of State
    Subject: Sport diving is a global industry. An economic analysis under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act will show that these regulations will negatively impact about 3 million sport divers and an industry that contributes about $11 billion to the US GDP. One thousand divers can create 30 full-time equivalent jobs. We need much clearer language to understand which sunken vessels are covered and what activities are prohibited.

    Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment, Catherine Novelli http://www.state.gov/contact/

    If you would like a sample copy of a letter to send each of these entities email me and I will send you one that you can add your own thoughts to and edit to reflect your views and style (do not just copy and paste it as it takes on the appearance of a form letter and those have less impact). Please take the time to do this. Wreck diving as we know it is in jeopardy. The impact this could have economically and historically is huge. Not mention the impact it could have on sport diving as a whole.
     

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