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Problem with foggy masks

Discussion in 'Snorkeling / Freediving' started by engblom, Jul 23, 2018.

  1. dcvf2

    dcvf2 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Belgium
    91
    54
    18
    Hi Sbiriguda
    What mask is it, brand and type?
    Try all soaping with dishwashing detergent, in very hot water, the skirt inside the mask and on the outside.
    Or put in the dishwasher
     
    Sbiriguda likes this.
  2. Sbiriguda

    Sbiriguda Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Italy
    968
    186
    43
    Thanks
    Its a Salvimar, type "Noah"
    Salvimar Noah Verde comprare e offerta su Scubastore
     
  3. WithingU

    WithingU Angel Fish

    9
    3
    3
    have you found the solution for your mask finally?
     
  4. PBcatfish

    PBcatfish Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Florida
    306
    267
    63
    When I was involved in a lead molding operation, it was common practice to preheat any metal tool before inserting it into the melt, because even a small amount of moisture would cause an 800 degree steam explosion & earn you "a visit from the tinsel fairy", that you did not want. the common way of heating the tools was with a propane torch. Normally, I would see a flash of fog on the tool, around the flame, where the vapor byproduct of the burning propane would condense on the room-temperature tool, until the tool got hot enough & the fog evaporated. It looked just like the fogging I see in the videos that use a butane lighter to burn off the silicone. I am left curious if the initial fog in the mask might actually be caused by the byproducts of the butane flame.

    The defog I use is a combo of baby shampoo, dish soap & a little water. My results have been good with that mix. It was a recipe that I found somewhere on this board, but I don't remember where. I can't remember if it was a little heavier in the dish soap or the baby shampoo.

    Edit:
    Actually, I think that I got my recipe from Lake Hickory Scuba. Their magic mix is 50% Dish soap, 40% baby shampoo, 10% water.
     
    Sbiriguda and tridacna like this.

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