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RAID Cave 1 - Good Course?

Discussion in 'Cave Diving' started by CaveSloth, Jul 3, 2018.

  1. rjack321

    rjack321 Captain

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    Watch the video again
    It is perfectly fine until 0:47
     
  2. wetb4igetinthewater

    wetb4igetinthewater Instructor, Scuba

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    Ah, needed to put on my glasses and watch it full screen.
     
  3. DeepSeaExplorer

    DeepSeaExplorer Solo Diver

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    Side mount is a great tool, where needed. Restrictions and health issues are both good examples.

    SM because it’s become the latest fad - not a good reason.

    Someone just learning to cave dive isn’t going in places that require SM. Better to start in BM and progress to SM if necessary. Most will never progress to the point where they need SM anyway.
     
  4. barth

    barth DIR Practitioner

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    Cave 1 is just 2 tanks.

    I have never seen an isolator failure. I have seen regulator failures. I have also seen a lot of free flowing regulators.

    If there were a lot of problems with isolators I was probably diving sidemount or independent doubles. But there are (almost) never problems with isolators.

    Even when there is a manifold or isolator failure you will loose maximal half of your gas.

    With a regulator failure with doubles you close the right valve. You can still use all your gas and just thumb the dive. When you have the same situation in sidemount it will be more complicated. How can a cave 1 diver with 2 sidemount tanks solve this problem ?
     
    rjack321 and JohnnyC like this.
  5. cerich

    cerich ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Many deaths can be directly related to isolator issues. Many more than from burst disk or neck o ring failures that the isolator is there to solve
     
  6. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC PADI Pro

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    Many? Maybe a handful. There are plenty of other things that kill divers far more reliably than an isolator.

    Swapping regs underwater is sketchy at best. So is hot lipping a valve. I can do both, in sterile training environments. I really doubt that anyone's success in performing either is going up when they have to do it in anger.

    I backmount, I sidemount, I dive a rebreather. Sidemount is my last choice, and only when it's the tool best suited to the job. I get that it's the bandwagon, but it has concrete disadvantages to backmount in many scenarios.
     
    rjack321 likes this.
  7. rjack321

    rjack321 Captain

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    In theory they have enough to exit, assuming they alternated tanks properly. Its just a more urgent exit because the gas in the tank with the reg failure may be functionally inaccessible. Or you might be able to feather the valve to access some of it. I don't have a problem with SM, unfortunately it's sold as a panacea for everything lately.
     
  8. CptTightPants21

    CptTightPants21 Solo Diver

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    Can you provide a couple of examples? I assume you mostly mean instances where the isolator was closed and a diver breathed the whole tank down. I could argue that these were diver error and complacency—not checking tank pressure even one time 5-10+ min into a dive. As a friendly debate, I’ll give you these “manifold” failure deaths, but then I get the sidemount roll-off deaths—starting with the one in Peacock a couple of years ago.



    I’m one of those right tool for the job guys, but I will admit SM has a purpose and is a necessity for certain divers. The one argument I won’t accept is that SM is EASIER off a boat. Manageable, sure—equipment lines, bolt snaps, etc, but BM anything is easier, especially in rough seas.
     
  9. rjack321

    rjack321 Captain

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    One woman quite a few years ago ended up with pure helium in her right tank. The left was breathable and supposedly the one she analyzed. It was a filling error but due to a closed isolator. She passed out from hypoxia but was recovered and after a long period of rehab she is alive and well - and even dove again. She was from the Tampa St Pete area and her name is Judy but I forgot her last name.
     
  10. cerich

    cerich ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    fixed it for ya.. :)

    if you SM and expect the tanks handed and taken from you, you are correct. If you know how to use them and enter and exit with them, MUCH easier than doubles in rough seas
     

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