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Recommend a warm semi-drysuit for snorkeling?

Discussion in 'Exposure Suits' started by stilldivin, Mar 10, 2020.

  1. Marie13

    Marie13 Great Lakes Mermaid ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Location: Great Lakes
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    The ones I mentioned are all semi-dry wetsuits.
     
  2. stilldivin

    stilldivin Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: San Jose, Ca.
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    What size and type? I'm 197 pounds, 5'10.5", waist 41", stomach 46".
     
  3. greeniguana

    greeniguana ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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  4. Jcp2

    Jcp2 Literally virtually diving ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Could you not orally inflate the drysuit prior to getting in the water? I’m assuming that you won’t be wearing weights to dive down, as you would be super buoyant in either the drysuit with a bit of air as well as a thick semi dry.
     
  5. stilldivin

    stilldivin Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: San Jose, Ca.
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    It can't be oral inflated, and you are not naturally buoyant in the newer dry suits.
     
  6. AustinV

    AustinV Contributor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: NoVA
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    We are about as far apart in body styles as two humans can be, sorry!
     
  7. MAKO Spearguns

    MAKO Spearguns ScubaBoard Business Sponsor ScubaBoard Business Sponsor

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    Thanks so much for asking. The suit is easy to put on. That is one of the big advantages of a freedive suit.

    These suits have a smooth rubber interior. This material slides extremely well over the skin when a proper suit lubricant is used. The suit slides on very easily, but it takes a minute or two to adequately prepare the suit with lubricant.

    So the short answer is: "no". A lycra suit would not be necessary nor benefical.

    This video should assist in understanding about how to don this type of suit.


     
  8. stilldivin

    stilldivin Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: San Jose, Ca.
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    I'm not almost 7 feet tall! (Oops!) I'm under 6 feet, but getting old sucks because I've put on weight.
     
  9. AustinV

    AustinV Contributor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: NoVA
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    Still probably not the right size, I am about 5'7", its a ML size, but probably would be too short for you. I do recommend it though if you see one used or on closeout, the SolAfx was a lot warmer than my 7mm Bare wetsuit.
     
  10. Esprise Me

    Esprise Me Kelp forest dweller ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Los Angeles, CA
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    There isn't a mechanism to orally inflate, but when you zip up there will be a fair amount of air trapped in the suit, which you would normally crouch with the valve open to squeeze out before getting in the water. If you weren't hooking up a tank and planned to stay on the surface, I suppose you could just not do that, or be a little less thorough to keep some air inside. It's an interesting idea.

    In OP's situation, though, I might go with one of the Mako suits. The folks I know who have them seem to really like them. Getting in and out is probably not going to be easy in any type of semi-dry, and the other drawback of freediving suits--compression at depth--wouldn't be an issue for snorkeling.
     

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