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Red Tide

Discussion in 'Florida' started by knives, Oct 4, 2005.

  1. SuPrBuGmAn

    SuPrBuGmAn Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Tallahassee, FL
    12,436
    290
    The red tides are being reported as far west as Gulf Shores, AL as of this mornings news reports.
     
  2. ReefGuy

    ReefGuy Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Punta Gorda, Fl.
    3,286
    859
    There is no way this is just a normal red tide bloom. It's being fueled by something.


    Something interesting: http://www.epa.gov/owow/coastal/Anderson/PineyPoint.pdf

    Look at page 4. Notice where they've been dumping this crap?

    Also, http://www.sptimes.com/2003/11/26/Tampabay/Piney_Point_dumping_i.shtml

    Seems awfully cooincidental.

     
  3. fldiver327

    fldiver327 Guest

    46
    0
    I live in Hudson, Florida about 25 miles North of Clearwater. My home is directly on the Gulf of Mexico. We have been dealing with red tide all summer long. At times it has been extremely apparent, many dead fish from 3 to 30 miles out. I have been following the news reports and I have spoken to many of the local commercial fisherman and other divers. This outbreak of Karenia brevis is the worst they have seen in years. Many divers are reporting tons of dead crabs on the bottom along with very scarce marine life sightings in areas normally abundant with life. Local biologists are saying that it could take up to two years before this area fully recovers. As stated earlier this is a naturally occurring phenomenon and due to the unusually high water temperature the outbreak has been widespread and long lasting. It is my understanding that we will not see any real relief from this season’s outbreak until we have a current shift. I can tell you from personal observation over the last two weeks I am seeing very few dead fish from inshore to out six miles. I am planning to dive this weekend out 15 miles from Hudson, I will report back on any red tide observations we encounter.
     
  4. matts1w

    matts1w Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Jakarta, Indonesia & Canggu, Bali, Indonesia
    1,588
    674
    Rats are a naturally occurring thing. There have always been rats. However, if you throw a bunch of garbage in your back yard you will have many more rats in the yard- If you feed rats you get more rats.

    There are five BILLION gallons of fresh water being released from the Big O every day through Fort Myers into the Gulf. This water is packed with phosphates and fertilizers. Our costal waters are now riddled with red tide and toxic blue - green algae. We are not only losing small trash fish like catfish, there have been dead manatees, dolphins, turtles, and large game fish washing up all over Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel, Captiva, Naples, etc...

    There have been huge fish kills due to red tide in the past, but these recent outbreaks are MUCH bigger and last MUCH longer. Also remember there was a huge outbreak off Englewood and Venice killing manatees in March- when the water was not yet eighty degrees.

    I wont even get into what all this freshwater is doing to our estuaries and sea grass.
     
  5. rdharbis1

    rdharbis1 Contributor

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: North Alabama
    231
    0
    I found out what Red Tide was the hard way a couple of years ago while vacationing in Panama City Beach, it was toward the end of the vacation season I believe. My kids and I couldn't wait to take a swim in the ocean and as soon as we unpacked the swim trunks we raced to the beach. The beach was a bit crowded but noone was in the water! It took just a few minutes for the algae, or whatever it is, to get to us and we literally had to feel our way back across the beach and to the motel room. It was awful for about an hour, couldn't keep the eyes open for but a few seconds at a time. Thankfully, it did eventually wear off completely but we definitely avoided the water. I asked the attendants at the motel and they enlightened me to "Red Tide."

    If this has been going on all summer for the Florida Gulf, I am sure it has effected the economy! That is pretty sad and I hope it is not an issue that becomes prominent in deciding when to go to the beach. I know it did not use to be a cocncern for the vacationer like me.
     
  6. cdiver2

    cdiver2 Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Safety Harbor (West central) GB xpat
    3,783
    3
    The water Temp usually runs at its highest point in the summer 89 this year (early on) it was 94
     
  7. matts1w

    matts1w Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Jakarta, Indonesia & Canggu, Bali, Indonesia
    1,588
    674
    This is from redtidealert.com:

    "March 13, 2005, Little Gasparilla, Boca Grande, Englewood, Sarasota, Fort Myers, Cayo Costa, Capitiva, Upper Captiva, Sanibel, Charlotte Harbor, all have been affected for 5 weeks from red Tide. It will not go away..

    Feburary 10th, 2005 massive red tide from Collier county to St Petersburg, it's now in the bays and estuaries. Fish kill is high and water quality very bad. Respiratory problems are affecting alot of people."

    The water in Feb. and March is far below 80 degrees. Blaming the warm water would make sense if there was not a massive outbreak when the Gulf was in its coldest state.
     
  8. knives

    knives Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Kingston,Ontario, Canada
    394
    8
    Do the hurracaines also affect this?
    All the rain and flooding being washed back in to the gulf?
     
  9. knives

    knives Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Kingston,Ontario, Canada
    394
    8
  10. SuPrBuGmAn

    SuPrBuGmAn Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Tallahassee, FL
    12,436
    290
    The red tide reports in the Northern Gulf are all pretty recent this year, nothing that has been lingering around all summer. Hopefully, the water will start cooling off and end it before it kills off all the life close to shore.
     

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