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Regulator recovery

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by Zef, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. Storker

    Storker ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    16,527
    13,011
    113
    To demonstrate for your OW/CMAS1* students that you should always keep your airways open and never close your glottis.

    While we - who of course are world class divers and always follow perfect practice (</sarcasm>) - are able to keep our airways open while not blowing bubbles, OW students can't be trusted to do that. So they're taught to blow a tiny stream of bubbles when they take their reg out of their gob.
     
  2. Dan_P

    Dan_P DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Scandinavia
    480
    168
    43
    Yep.
     
  3. Dan_P

    Dan_P DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Scandinavia
    480
    168
    43
    Okay, fair enough.

    Personally, I don't teach in a different way than how I dive.
    Personally, I wouldn't certify someone I can't trust to make an ascend without closing their airways.
    Personally, my students have their bouyancy and breathing down in the first hour of Confined 1, so I don't bother teaching them an inapplicable skill to fix a problem that I don't see exist.
     
    rongoodman likes this.
  4. Storker

    Storker ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    16,527
    13,011
    113
    Well AFAIK, it's The Way to teach n00bs, both in PADI and in CMAS. Regarding teaching at n00b level, I believe that the instructor's "personal" opinion is trumped by agency standards and practice.

    I'm not an instructor, but I got a bit of insight in teaching standards when I took my 3*.

    On hindsight: how can you be certain that your students aren't closing their glottis when they take their reg out of their gob?
     
  5. Zef

    Zef Divemaster

    2,666
    2,125
    113
    .
     
  6. Dan_P

    Dan_P DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Scandinavia
    480
    168
    43
    Of course you're right that standards trump personal opinion, whichever organization one opts for, but the standards are MILES away from oneanother across agencies.
    So just because PADI, CMAS or anyone else does something in one way doesn't mean I have to adhere to it.
    Nor does that give any indication as to whether it makes sense, in my opinion.

    Some adhere to the WRSTC's guidelines (which are really just PADI's guidelines), but I don't think there's any reason to give the WRSTC any serious consideration in the framework of an official entity;
    It's just a regular trade association maintaining its members' (dive agencies' (businesses)) interests, so I have zero problems turning my back on their approaches in favor of something more... Well, contemporary.

    I mean these cats took till like 2007 to be rid of buddy breathing :wink: Come on.
     
  7. Dan_P

    Dan_P DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Scandinavia
    480
    168
    43
    It's the other way around.
    I can see that they're holding still. That's the safety, right there. No ascend, no Boyle's, no danger, no bubbles.

    I only need to see bubbles when the students are ascending (obviously a bit here and there during the dive, too), which fortunately is very easy to confirm visually.

    So it's really a non-issue, that part. And starting out getting them buttoned op on breathing and buouyancy from Day 1 really establishes a solid base to learn from.

    In my experience.
     
  8. AJ

    AJ Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Netherlands
    673
    384
    63
    Ah, been there, done that and don't do it anymore as I don't see the point. Same as buddy line, buddy breathing and snorkels :confused: And no, I'am far from being a perfect diver. I hope I one day will be :D
     
  9. Storker

    Storker ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    16,527
    13,011
    113
    What's your problem with those? While buddy breathing well might go the way of the dodo except in very special circumstances, both buddy lines and snorkels may well have some utility if the conditions call for it. I usually don't use either a snorkel nor a buddy line, but OTOH I've been in situations where I've seriously appreciated having one of them.
     
    Bob DBF likes this.
  10. Dan_P

    Dan_P DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Scandinavia
    480
    168
    43
    I'm with AJ.

    Buddy breathing stopped making sense twenty years ago, but to each their own.

    Last year, a retired head of investigations related to scuba diving from the Danish police special task force held a public presentation on the scuba injuries and fatalities he'd seen through his career.
    His message was chrystal clear: forget about buddy lines, they're a killer.
    Personally, I think he knew what he was talking about, and I personally don't think it makes any sense either, but to each their own.

    Snorkels. Haven't personally used one in ages for anything scuba. There are applications, but for me, it makes a lot of sense with a pocket snorkel. But to each their own.

    That's 3 times "to each their own", and I think I'll leave it at that :)
     

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