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Regulator Vomiting

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Scuba_Noob, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. Scuba_Noob

    Scuba_Noob Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Victoria, BC
    1,000
    195
    0
    Just recently, I vomited underwater while diving.

    So I was feeling a little sick before the second dive, and we had a short surface interval on pretty wavy waters on a boat charter. I felt that once I got into the water, I'd be fine as usual. We went down to a maximum of 35ft on our second dive.

    During the dive, I started feeling a little dizzy and short of breath. I suspected something wrong with the air, although it tasted fine on the surface, so I signaled an ascent. At around 10ft, I puked. From Scubaboard, I read that puking in the regulator can be done, so I puked in my reg and breathed in.

    However, I found I couldn't breathe out, so I had to breathe out without the regulator. I guess some chunks were stuck. I switched to my octo and ascended to avoid any issue. I then purged my primary regulator very thoroughly, and breathing was fine. Then we decided to redescend as I was a bit more comfortable after the puking. I called the dive after another 15 minutes, feeling the same symptoms. On the boat, I puked a couple more times off the side. Then I felt great the rest of the trip, including the boat ride back and the next four dives throughout the week.

    So the question here is: Is it normal to get chunks stuck when vomiting in a reg, enough that you can't exhale properly?

    And are any of these symptoms indicative of a CO hit (note that I felt better after the final vomit and didn't feel any symptoms again, even with more diving on future days)?
     
  2. danvolker

    danvolker Dive Shop

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Lake Worth, Florida, United States
    5,884
    2,999
    0
    And now another 20 people that read your post, just vomited on their keyboards... thanks :wink:

    CO was very unlikely. Regs will clear this with purge. Next time, irrigate with double strength saline with neil med nasal irrigation system ( get at local drugstore) and an hour before you get on the boat, take 1 or 2 triptones....If it is really rough, you can add 2 aspirin.
     
  3. ermaclob

    ermaclob Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Miami Dade County, Florida
    483
    70
    28
    Your not the only one. ive seen plenty of people throw up. me included.
     
  4. HowardE

    HowardE Diver

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Boca Raton, Florida
    19,220
    1,429
    113
    Sounds like you were seasick.

    While I've never hurled in my regulator, i don't believe it's normal to get chunks stuck in the exhaust. However... Purging and shaking the regulator vigorously should solve that, and remove any chunks while on your dive. If not... Remove the cover and diaphragm, and clean thoroughly.

    While hypercapnia can result in nausea and even vomiting, it's unlikely, and more likely that you were just seasick.
     
  5. Scuba_Noob

    Scuba_Noob Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Victoria, BC
    1,000
    195
    0
    Yeah, I was pretty sure it wasn't CO (based on further research), but I'm just extra paranoid. The dizziness and such were probably due to the seasickness.

    The seasickness was probably due to the breakfast I had, the excessive boat rocking during the surface interval, and maybe some nerves due to it being my first few tropical dives. I almost never get seasick, but I guess it was the perfect chain of events that day. I guess Gravol is my friend now.
     
  6. HowardE

    HowardE Diver

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Boca Raton, Florida
    19,220
    1,429
    113
    Almost never? So you have been seasick?

    Sent from my SCH-I510 using Tapatalk 2
     
  7. g1138

    g1138 Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Charleston, SC
    3,054
    781
    113
    [video=youtube;keB2LH-KSAE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keB2LH-KSAE[/video]
     
  8. Doc

    Doc Was RoatanMan

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Chicago & O'Hare heading thru TSA 5x per year
    9,896
    2,637
    113
    Not me, nope, never. You?

    Fed the fish a few times, but no- never been seasick.
     
  9. 50Fathom

    50Fathom NAUI Instructor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Central Texas
    308
    194
    0
    Had a buddy get seasick on a boat one morning. It didn't help that he was out partying the night prior.

    First dive, he barfed through the regulator. We dive with 7' hoses, so he switched to his backup, deployed the primary, unscrewed the faceplate, cleaned out the reg, put it back together and drove on.

    We found out two things that day:

    1. Scrambled eggs are neutrally buoyant.

    2. The fish LOVE you if you provide breakfast.

    The rest of the day was uneventful. :D
     
  10. CajunDiva

    CajunDiva Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: South Louisiana
    2,411
    1,467
    113
    Same thing happened to me on my very first ocean dive! Fortunately, I had just completed my OW course and learned that the regulator could take it...so I tested that theory. I was happy to learn that it was true! But immediate purging is definitely necessary. I was amazed that the regulator was able to handle such an offense, but that's a lot of "stuff" getting forced in there at one time - it would be easy for things to get "clogged up". Just practice a little binge and purge action :wink:
     

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