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Safari Diver of Pompano Beach had a special weekend.

Discussion in 'Accidents & Incidents' started by Ana, Jul 19, 2021 at 7:02 AM.

  1. Capt Jim Wyatt

    Capt Jim Wyatt Hanging at the 10 Foot Stop Staff Member

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: High Springs - Cave Country
    2,843
    2,108
    Absolutely!!

    Stern tying is more difficult than tying to the bow --
     
  2. jadairiii

    jadairiii Solo Diver

    721
    877
    I wouldn't know.....I've never done it.... :)
     
    cerich likes this.
  3. johndiver999

    johndiver999 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Gainesville FL
    1,750
    1,822

    LOL.. 2 captains.. It ain't that hard! You just have to have divers that can enter the water on command and immediately descend vertically in an expeditious manner. Normally not that big of a deal for the boat driver or divers.
     
  4. jadairiii

    jadairiii Solo Diver

    721
    877
    Actually, for a capt, it is exceedingly hard, it is a skill. They have to contend with current, wind, waves, other boats and timing. Time the drop early, divers never see the wreck, too slow, divers drift forever, and never see the wreck. There is no room for error.
     
  5. kensuf

    kensuf ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    2,443
    3,552
    Since I was quoted, let me clarify. When there's a stiff current, my preferred method of getting on a wreck is a hot drop.
     
  6. kensuf

    kensuf ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    2,443
    3,552
    There's some skill involved. I nearly missed the Hydro on a dive last summer in a stiff current. It's a pretty good sized boat, 350' long, heading north to south (stern to bow) in the gulf stream. We we given a 400' lead, dropped at about 100' a minute, and still barely caught the stern. If he had given us a shorter lead we would have never made it on the wreck.
     
    NothingClever, rjack321 and jadairiii like this.
  7. johndiver999

    johndiver999 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Gainesville FL
    1,750
    1,822
    That's not a very quick descent rate, but yes you need a good lead when the current is fast, I would have dropped further south than 400 ft, if it was ripping. It's a skill - it takes a while to figure it out (always better to be dropped early rather than late).

    BTW, Im not sure your math works with the lead, the descent rate and the length of the ship.
     
  8. kensuf

    kensuf ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    2,443
    3,552
    Well I was at 150' in 90 seconds, so I know the descent rate is correct and I know the boat is 350' long from having been on it a few times. The lead is what the captain told us he was giving us.
     
  9. kensuf

    kensuf ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    2,443
    3,552
    Correction, 80 seconds we were at 150'. We still barely got on the wreck.
    Screen Shot 2021-07-22 at 3.59.26 PM.png
     
    ChuckP and jadairiii like this.
  10. 100days-a-year

    100days-a-year Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: NE Florida
    2,375
    883
    Near as possible 1kt of current is 100 fpm. Makes it pretty simple to figure drift drops unless you have wind which can complicate it.
     
    Johnoly likes this.

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