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Scuba diver dies after complaining of gear malfunction

Discussion in 'Accidents and Incidents' started by CuzzA, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. uncfnp

    uncfnp Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
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    See chilly’s response. Uncorrected, respiratory arrest will ultimately lead to cardiac arrest. Then too a multitude of events could lead to cardiovascular collapse without any underlying cardiac disease.
     
    markmud, Altamira and chillyinCanada like this.
  2. CuzzA

    CuzzA Solo Diver

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    So would any of the types of pulmonary barotrauma lead to symptoms that would lead a medic to believe an AED would help her?

    Is coughing up blood a symptom of a heart attack?
     
  3. PfcAJ

    PfcAJ Orca

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    No.
     
  4. Dan_T

    Dan_T Great White

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    Coughing up blood could be a symptom of IPE, according to Michael McFadyen's Scuba Diving Web Site
     
  5. NYdiver_666

    NYdiver_666 Angel Fish

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    Interesting piece - however as I read it it seems that one would expect to see blood almost as soon as the diver surfaces - in this case the diver was on the surface sometime before any blood was reported and only after she had stopped breathing and was being administered CPR
     
  6. JackD342

    JackD342 Dive Shop

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    Assuming the machine observed was not woefully out of date, let's remember that a modern AED determines on it's own whether or not there is a shockable rhythm. I would not expect anyone with the most basic layman's training on an AED to be applying a shock when it wasn't actually needed or useful. It is not a judgement call, it is simply a matter of using it properly - no human diagnosis needed at that point.
     
  7. CuzzA

    CuzzA Solo Diver

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    I had some AED training for a professional CPR class. I'm not in the medical field, but IIRC, it was taught to me that if there's no heart beat and you have an AED, hook it up to the victim and it will tell you what to do or basically do everything for you.
     
  8. JackD342

    JackD342 Dive Shop

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Highland Park, IL
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    You are kind of right, except for "no heart beat." An AED is designed to apply a shock when there is a fibrillating heart beat. In the absence of a shockable rhythm, or of any heart beat at all, it will NOT tell you to shock the victim, nor will it do so itself.

    I am not a medical professional, but I am an Emergency First Response instructor. (PADI's brand for CPR/AED/First Aid)

    I should add that you do have to go through all of the preliminaries for the AED to decide whether or not to shock - strip the victim's shirt off, apply the pads, start the AED, all while performing CPR. So to a casual observer it might appear that someone is "shocking" the victim, even when that is not actually the case.
     
    markmud likes this.
  9. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board

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    You weren't there and neither was I. I'm going to trust the boots on the site to have made the right decisions. If there is no heart beat, then BLS, including defibrillation would be reasonable responses. Treating a patient without a heartbeat for anything else sounds fairly unreasonable. At least to me.
     
  10. uncfnp

    uncfnp Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: North Carolina
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    Let me see if I understand your question and can answer.

    AED is for cardiac arrest, which does not necessarily mean heart attack, and is now part of BCLS. Any circumstance that calls for BCLS for a pulseless (no heart beat by palpation) victim would be appropriate for AED.

    And no, coughing up blood is not indicative of an MI.
     
    tridacna, markmud and Altamira like this.

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