• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

SeaMonster at Dubai Aquarium and Underwater Zoo?

Discussion in 'Marine Life & Ecosystems' started by jagfish, Apr 3, 2021.

  1. jagfish

    jagfish The man behind the fish ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Kanagawa and Florida
    3,772
    235
    I saw this. Was great to have her insightful comment...Tammy, right?
     
  2. WeRtheOcean

    WeRtheOcean Contributor

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location:
    226
    109
    One of the reasons I don't enjoy aquaria anymore -- the other is that, like zoos, I never see them give the animals enough space. How big would that shark's home range be in the wild?
     
    RyanT and chillyinCanada like this.
  3. Pressurehead

    Pressurehead ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Queensland Australia
    534
    409
    Great shot.
    The biggest of this species I have seen was under a thermocline at 30m off Wolf Rock Queensland, the most in one area was South West Rocks NSW, years ago it Magic Point off Sydney [that was 30+ years ago].
    Thanks for the memories of great dives with them.
     
  4. Raphus

    Raphus DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Germany
    333
    270
    I am not saying that your wife is wrong, she definitely got the experience.
    But I thought sand tiger sharks sleep while lieing on the bottom? As far as I know they can breath actively.

    A local on the original video said that the jaw was broken and didn't heal well. Don't know if that's true
     
  5. chris kippax

    chris kippax Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Australia
    877
    685
    Grey Nurse,ragged tooth, sand tigers will die if they stop swimming.
     
  6. chris kippax

    chris kippax Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Australia
    877
    685
    Love diving Wolf rock, some good sized sharks there.
    This was shot at Wobby rock off Mooloolaba
     
    Pressurehead likes this.
  7. Pressurehead

    Pressurehead ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Queensland Australia
    534
    409
    Diving there next week, grey nurse sharks use it as a transitional home in the cooler months, so the local dive shop 'blurb' says.
    I have only seen wobbegong sharks there now [as the name says], we did seen them in the past there [ I ran a dive charter from Mooloolaba for a number of years ].
     
  8. RyanT

    RyanT ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Maryland
    2,208
    2,068
    I agree. The sand tigers we see on the wrecks in North Carolina hang out on a shipwreck and then periodically move to other wrecks miles away. So the home range is huge.

    Not true, we see sand tigers resting on the bottom all the time.
     
    WinfieldNC likes this.
  9. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
    11,381
    9,285
    There are a few sharks that are "obligate ram ventilators" -- meaning they must keep moving to breathe -- like the Great White, Mako, and Whale sharks, but the sand tigers (Carcharias taurus) or Grey Nurse or ragged tooth, depending on where you live, are not in that ram ventilator group.
     
  10. Dan

    Dan ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
    7,163
    4,700
    Sand Tiger Sharks (Carcharias Taurus) “Despite its fearsome appearance and strong swimming ability, it is a relatively placid and slow-moving shark with no confirmed human fatalities....” Sand tiger shark - Wikipedia

    One of the DMs from https://www.aquaticsafaris.com/ described it as pussy cat of the sea, for their mild manner despite those scary looking curvy teeth sticking out.

    They are not shy either. I have been swimming in very close proximity with them and they just go on their business, which make them to be a great video / photo objects. Unlike the shy hammerheads which I have to hold my breath and use no video light to be closed to them. As soon as I exhale, they would disappear in a jiffy.
     

Share This Page