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Search and Rescue - Lasers and Signaling Devices

Discussion in 'Equipment and Procedures' started by mtngoat2674, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. Hoag

    Hoag Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Ontario
    1,257
    913
    113
    I just sent an email to the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre In Victoria BC and asked:
    If/when I get a response, I will post it.
     
  2. Diver below 83

    Diver below 83 Barracuda

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: SoFlo
    435
    124
    43
    “ I have a couple questions, directed primarily at the pilots or spotters:
    1. If you were conducting a real world SAR mission and a pilot, a spotter or a SARTech was lased, what would be your most likely response?
    2. Is a laser an effective method to alert airborne SAR assets to your location if lost at sea?
    3. What would you recommend as an effective method for someone like a scuba diver to carry to alert airborne SAR assets (mirror, strobe, dive light, laser, etc)?”

    The article posted previously about the diver rescued answered all these questions.

    1. The helicopter was lasered by the lost diver. The helicopter was searching the wrong area too close to shore but was alerted to this by the divers green laser being shot at them from further out in sea. After being shot the diver was located and rescued.

    2. Absolutely. Again the article clearly states the diver was rescued solely because of the green laser providing them with his location. US law allows the use of lasers for this exact reason.

    3. Yes. All of the above. It’s been pointed out the more tools in your arsenal the better chance you have. The lost diver who was rescued had Multiple items but those items failed to provide his location. The laser was the last resort and work.
     
  3. SapphireMind

    SapphireMind Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: CA, USA
    140
    94
    28
    If we were talking about hot stoves though for SAR, it would be appropriate to talk about other issues with hot stoves.

    It does not permanently damage their retinas, but how many different ways do I need to explain that permanent damage to the retina is not the only risk?

    SAR would not be "called off", I disagree with that opinion. And I didn't say it was "bad" for a diver to use. There are better things for a diver to use that pose zero risk.

    There are many people (once again, myself included prior to joining a flight team) that don't realize the dangers of a laser. So when people talk lasers, it's good to throw in a general PSA, especially when people like you are insisting that it is not true.

    With what you have asserted, it would be totally cool to aim lasers at all the aircraft all the time. It won't permanently blind them, so it's fine.
     
  4. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,393
    608
    113
    I have performed aerial searches of the open ocean. It is almost impossible to see anyone in the water. You really need some way to signal aircraft.

    Lasers seem kinda dangerous to me. I use a signal mirror.
     
    SapphireMind likes this.
  5. soldsoul4foos

    soldsoul4foos ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Portland, ME
    634
    212
    43
    I was always under this understanding during the entire thread. :) It seems common sense.
     
    Johnoly likes this.
  6. Hoag

    Hoag Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Ontario
    1,257
    913
    113
    Actually, it answered them in one specific case. I reached out to people who do SAR for a living as to what their professional opinion is. One example that worked out well does not definitively prove a thing.

    Like I said before, if you want to carry a laser, do it.
     
  7. soldsoul4foos

    soldsoul4foos ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Portland, ME
    634
    212
    43
    Going from memory but I believe I also brought up this point some 20 pages ago. If I'm going to be imo in a possible situation like Cameron may have been, I'm going to have my lights and a laser I think.
     
  8. fsardone

    fsardone Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Rome, Italy
    395
    295
    63
    During daytime in a sunny day laser will have very little effect unless you hit somebody directly in the eye ... and I very much doubt they will be able to determine the direction of the hit.
    A signaling mirror on the other end will be:
    more effective;
    not subject to battery being dead;
    not subject to flooding;
    cheaper.
     
  9. soldsoul4foos

    soldsoul4foos ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Portland, ME
    634
    212
    43
    Those are very good points. Mirror added!
     
  10. Hoag

    Hoag Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Ontario
    1,257
    913
    113
    A mirror was suggested in post 18 as being a good method but ignored until now. I am genuinely happy that you now see the value of it.
     

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