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Servicing your own regulators

Discussion in 'Regulators' started by Rick Warren, Feb 20, 2021.

Would you take a Manufacturer Approved Class on regulator servicing if offered?

Poll closed Feb 27, 2021.
  1. Yes

    92.3%
  2. No

    7.7%
  1. BackAfter30

    BackAfter30 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Denver
    101
    92
    ...and those parts are? (for those of us trying to just get a sense of all of this) I'm following that "those parts" are solving the adjusting-under-pressure issue discussed above, but I don't recognize what was cobbled together there.
     
  2. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    That's why you need my Super Duper
    Yet To Be Created Scuba Technician's Zoom Seminar! :troll:
    Stand by!

    Seriously...
    The parts are: a slide on/off switch attached to the back of an inline adjuster.
    Here's the reasoning:
    - turning the orifice in the barrel of a standard balanced second stage may cut the seat, because spring pressure pushes the rubber pad hard against the knife edge used to seal.

    - pressing the purge button is the recommended practice to lift the seat off the knife edge when tuning (assuming you're not like @The Chairman , who has enough experience to get it right the first time)

    - pressing the purge button is noisy and wastes a lot of tank air for many of us who don't have unlimited gas supplies in our home shop

    - you can adjust, pressurize, test cracking effort, turn off tank, purge, readjust, repressurize, test, etc., etc., but it's very cumbersome (and even worse if you don't have an inline adjuster, and have to take the hose off each time to use a screwdriver on the orifice).

    SOOO...
    It's simpler to use an inline on/off switch with your inline adjuster.
    Pressurize, and hearing a hiss, slowly close the knife edge against the seat. When the hiss stops, close the on/off and purge the tiny bit of air between the switch and the reg (no waste).
    With the seat lifted, add 5 minutes on the clock to the orifice (1/12 turn). Repressurize and check cracking effort. For further fine tuning, just slide the switch off, purge and do whatever is needed with the orifice or poppet spring.
    Screenshot_20210223-084732_Firefox.jpg
    Scuba Tools PN 20-500-200
    Screenshot_20210223-084935_Chrome.jpg
     
    couv, Pumpkin King, James79 and 2 others like this.
  3. formernuke

    formernuke ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: New England
    3,118
    2,812
    So is the Guage needed attached to the inline adjuster?
     
  4. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    17,127
    20,872
    Thanks @rsingler - I wouldn't have time to type that....
     
  5. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    I have my gauge mounted near my magnehelic.
    20200123_145601.jpg
    So does @The Chairman.
    Others like seeing it right next to the adjuster.
    Tomaytoes, tomahtoes. :)

    By the way, you can put together a $3000 gas bench for very little money. That's a brass welding gas manifold that I use to provide any tank pressure from 0-2500 psi from a tank ($50 used). Two magnehelics (0-3" and -5"-0-5") for $30 each. An old precision 0-300psi gauge for $40 and a cheap large face 0-300psi gauge for $15. The only new parts are the rotameter (0-15 cfm) for $150 and the mounted tank valve equivalent for $80. I use a $40 mini Shop-Vac to generate suction for the rotameter.
    In that pic I'm testing a Mk10/G250 at low tank pressure (500psi) showing what looks to be 1.4" dynamic effort at 4cfm flow. That Venturi vane needs a little tweaking! :D
     
    Southside, rhwestfall and BackAfter30 like this.
  6. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    17,127
    20,872
    tamales...

    If you don't have one already, it can be helpful there. There is some opinions that the gauge on the LPI hose may not be accurate as there could be a venturi type action on the first stage ports that over represents a possible pressure drop to the LPI hose... I too have a large gauge pair for IP and vacuum...

    Others will have more to say...
     
  7. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    If you want to get a little more creative with test equipment, go to Home Depot and get a $40 pneumatic regulator for air drive equipment. Take an old Conshelf or other first stage and crank the spring down tight so it generates, say, 180 psi.
    IMG_20200603_145423777.jpg
    Use the first stage to generate IP from that tank on the left, and the cheap regulator to adjust to any desired output pressure from, say, 110‐160 psi. At the twist of a dial you can tune your second stage without your first, or easily tune both a Poseidon Cyklon that wants 161psi, and 5 minutes later a G260 for ice diving at 120psi IP.
    Total cost: $40 automotive regulator, some copper tubing and an old first stage. The only odd piece is a 1/4"NPT male to 3/8"UNF female adapter to go from the copper tubing to the blue regulator hose. $5.
     
    CycleCat, Kupu and rhwestfall like this.
  8. jakehbk

    jakehbk Contributor

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: California
    78
    44
    What's your opinion on tuning the 2nd stage according to the case geometry fault in a bucket of water? Tuning juuust till the bubbles stop burping out the exhaust? Too unstable? Too light? Too much hassle?

    I'd def be down for a Zoom course for the record.
     
  9. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    Good thinking! Really good thinking!
    In practical terms, that's probably 0.1" light, IMO
    You must have read Regulator Savvy!

    And thanks for the Zoom support. I'm starting to put this together and investigating Zoom license costs. I'm working on connections for a starter tool set for those that don't yet have tools at home. I think maybe 3-4 months to get this together and smooth out the presentation wrinkles. Just in time for summer!

    Get vaccinated, as soon as it's offered! Ocean, here we come!
     
    The Chairman likes this.
  10. formernuke

    formernuke ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: New England
    3,118
    2,812
    Can't so I'm going for herd or a safe one for me.


    I'm liking zoom
     

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