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Sharks face to face?

Discussion in 'Marine Life and Ecosystems' started by cherinere, Apr 16, 2001.

  1. keralucu

    keralucu Senior Member

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Beijing, China
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    Cherinere, Aardal, Walter, Dennis et al....

    Yep your last few posts definitely make us scaredy-cats feel better about sharks. Actually, I'm not really scared any more because since I decided I was going to do my OW, I have watched about 2000 hours of National Geographic and Discovery channel - any program to do with being under water - and since a lot concern sharks, it has helped get rid of my fear.

    As I am in warm water, I don't have to worry about Great Whites... they never appear in the Gulf of Thailand, although we do get bull sharks and hammerheads sometimes... what I've heard is that if you see a dangerous shark, if possible, get your back up against a cliff wall and then you're pretty ok- is this true?

    Also LOL about stabbing my buddy (who happens to be my sister!) and feeding her to the sharks while I lazily swim back to the boat....

    As everyone says, try and relax and enjoy seeing them.

    Cheers :)
     
  2. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

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    .........the student who doesn't laugh when I tell the stab your buddy joke.

    WWW™
     
  3. dmentia

    dmentia Angel Fish

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    WWW,
    Stabbing your dive buddy is no laughing matter. There are many ethical, moral, and mechanical questions that need to be considered before such an action. For instance, do you stab just enough to get a good blood letting going, or do you incapcitate in order to save yourself from repercussions? After the shark has finished with your buddy, do you attempt to bring back the parts, or do you consider that other sharks in the area may be attracted to your "chum". (Yes, since I am going down the long and winding road of dark humor, that pun IS intended!)

    So, the next time someone doesn't laugh at that joke, perhaps it is because they are fraught with indecision!
    dmentia (for once the name might be right on!):all:
     
  4. cherinere

    cherinere Nassau Grouper

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    This one question has been my daily chuckle, if I had known it would of gone over this big, it would of been my first one. Although my buddy is getting nervous, I keep calling him my chum instead of buddy, and he reminds me constantly that he is the only one of us that carries a dive knive. Maybe I am the one that should be a little nervous I don't want my new nick name to be (Bob)
     
  5. DocVikingo

    DocVikingo Senior Member

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    Hi cher,

    A shark's sensitivity to urine is about the same as for blood. It's an attractant.

    You should have a complete blast in GC.

    DocVikingo
     
  6. keralucu

    keralucu Senior Member

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Beijing, China
    1,015
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    ..... reading all your posts about "chumming" and buddy sacrifice!

    If/when I ever get to see an actual shark down there I'm probably going to piss myself laughing just thinking about this discussion.... OH NO, and then I'll really be in trouble according to DocVikingo... :p
     
  7. cherinere

    cherinere Nassau Grouper

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    Seriously;
    do you know why urine is a attraction to sharks, what elements in it attract them? And exactly how was this found out? I know this will bring all sorts of replies from the scuba peanut gallery but I would like to know.
     
  8. luvdiving

    luvdiving Barracuda

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    Cher

    I am fortunate enough to live and on Johnston Atoll (SW of Hawaii) for eight weeks out of ten. The other two weeks are in Naples, Fla. I teach SCUBA on JA in my spare time. With hundreds of dives on the Atoll and hundreds of shark encounters, I have never had a problem. We have Gray Reef Sharks, Whitetip's, Galapagos and Tigers (I've never seen the Tiger). Many of my students have small Gray Sharks around them during their first open water dives. For the most part, they accept the sharks as just another fish to be enjoyed (after they live through theit first encounter). So, dive safe and enjoy the ride.

    Ken
     
  9. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
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    Hey all,

    This HAS been one of the funnier threads on the board... too cool! Shark-a-phobia has always been a hot topic here in Florida where more people get chhomped on than the entire continent. There is (allegedly, for I have not yet encountered him) a semi-mythical beast who prowls the reef just off of Boyton Beach by the name of Snaggletooth. According to many (yes, more than have seen Nessie) Snaggletooth is an 18 ft Hammerhead. Very docile when encountered. They only injuries that can be attributed to this magnificent specimen are a direct result from the panic he instills when you "happen" upon him. You freak! Everyone who claims to have met Snaggletooth has learned how to scream AND backpeddle underwater. Some have induced various barotrauma by surfacing way too quickly (he is the 60-80 ft depths) I heard one Dive Master talk about watching one of his charges panicing and him getting closer to see what was happening. THEN he saw Snaggletooth and subsequently did his own "Its bigger than me" underwater dance.

    I take great solice in the fact that I am NOT on their grocery list. Also, when I am approached (once by a 10-12 ft bull) I try to read their intent. If their back is arched and their heads are slightly swaying side to side, I head for the bottom. It freaks them right out. I let them pass, or I slowly move away from them, I surface and then the first thing I say to my buddy is "DID YOU SEE THAT??? HOW COOL!!!"

    The only "other" shark encounter for me was off of Ponce Inlet. There is a wreck just outside of the surf line and barely north of the inlet. Only part of a mast remains nows, the other parts were buried when they bulit the jetty. I was mucking on around on the bottom trying to unearth a bit of it, it was low tide, the vis was horrible and the stupid shark ran into my tank. I think he was more surprised than I was, although I did a 180 which was sort of cool. I never did see what type he was, and no, he did bite any of my gear either, and yes I DID check for bite marks.

     
  10. DocVikingo

    DocVikingo Senior Member

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    Hi Cher,

    Human urine contains organic compounds similar to those that sharks use to locate marine prey. Marine biologists have long studied substances that attract & repel sharks.

    Go and have anxiety-free diving.

    DocVikingo
     

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