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Shearwater Nerd for PSD?

Discussion in 'Public Safety Divers' started by paperdesk, Nov 14, 2017.

  1. paperdesk

    paperdesk Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Inchelium, WA
    353
    16
    18
  2. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    14,097
    5,602
    113
    if you are using FFM it would be a very good alternative to wrist computers. If not using FFM, then I would not use it. Since most PSD's are using FFM's, then I would 100% advocate for it, especially with a pair of transmitters, one on backgas, one on pony bottle. Stick a button gauge on them to verify that they're full at the surface and do it to it
     
  3. paperdesk

    paperdesk Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Inchelium, WA
    353
    16
    18
    Thanks for the reply. We're in the process of switching to FFM. My super old wrist computer just quite talking to the transmitter, and looking at possible replacement options I bumped into the nerd.
     
  4. rkinder

    rkinder Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Seneca, SC
    41
    44
    18
    For the most important safety item in diving that is a pressure gauge, there is no replacement for a easy to read Analog Pressure Gauge. Each transducer placed on the regulator opens another point of failure. While eliminating hoses is nice I feel it is much better to properly route them and secure them close to the body with clips. When it becomes time to check pressure unclip extend read and return to clip. I have used various transducers over the years but always go back to a high quality SPG. In fact I dive with 2 computers, an analog depth gauge, stop watch, and tables on every dive. Computers fail rarely now but they still fail, so I keep simple reliable backups.
     
  5. paperdesk

    paperdesk Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Inchelium, WA
    353
    16
    18
    I agree that best practice is to carry an SPG, however, it also seems to me that HUD would be a wise addition. What are the cons? Having the vital info in your face all the time seems a lot better than having it clipped to your waist. I can clip and unclip just fine with dry or wet gloves on, but in all honesty I find I don't check pressure as often as I should simply because it gets to be a pain.
     
  6. rkinder

    rkinder Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Seneca, SC
    41
    44
    18
    I can't disagree that a HUD has advantages, making some tasks much easier, and in some cases safer. Just call me OLD Fashioned for sticking with analog for SPG. But after 48 years of diving I have experienced many electronic failures, of course this has decreased over the last 5 to 8 years. as things become more reliable. But they still fail, for many reasons. I won't get mad if that is your decision to trust electronics, it is simply my decision to KISS when it comes to pressure.

    I have developed a personal habit of counting breaths and keeping up with my pressure at various depths, and normally find that I am within 100 PSI. but this takes lots of practice and time in the water, in addition it is a skill that goes away quickly when not done on a regular basis. For the diver getting in the water 10 to 20 times a year this is not a good option.
     
  7. paperdesk

    paperdesk Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Inchelium, WA
    353
    16
    18
    I have never run out of "air" and usually have a very good idea of what I have left whether I look at the gauge or not. However, add some stress and task loading, and I could see that all going out the window. I wouldn't advocate a single computer as replacement for an SPG, but in addition to it. The SPG would be the backup.

    I'm not an experienced diver like many of you with 1000's of dives, and really want to know the pros and cons, so I want to get honest feedback.

    Ted
    .
     
  8. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    14,097
    5,602
    113
    three of the highest failure prone components of a scuba regulator are the HP hose itself, and the pair of tiny o-rings in the spool. Moving to a transmitter eliminates all three of them.
    The failure mode it adds is loss of signal. That will be due to battery failure, some weird interference issue, or component failure. Any of which results in end of dive, no different than a failed HP spool or hose.

    What it adds in terms of safety benefits is that you can see the gas contents of both of your tanks 100% of the time without having to look away from the task at hand and take away your hands from what they are doing. The reliability has gone up tremendously over the last several years, particular with Shearwater committing to the cause, and to me the tradeoffs are the cost of the components themselves. If you can swing it, I personally see no reason for continuing with analog gauges
     
    paperdesk likes this.
  9. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

    2,629
    1,107
    113
    Is the HUD still visible in black water? That would seem very useful for a PSD.
     
  10. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    14,097
    5,602
    113
    no less visible than a computer held at your mask. Unfortunately the Oceanic Datamask is about the only thing that's truly visible in no viz conditions because it is inside of your mask, but this gets real bloody close
     

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