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Sinking a boat with minimal damage

Discussion in 'Boats and Boating Equipment' started by JackOfDiamonds, Sep 10, 2019 at 11:41 AM.

  1. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Solo Diver

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    No pond yet, just put the boat where you want. Be sure to strip it of any added floatation. Probably a good idea to put a little extra ballast to make sure it doesn't float. A 1" spade bit and a cordless drill and put a few strategic holes in it. An engine block (stripped couple hundred pounds of iron) will hold a lot on the bottom.

    Now if the planned pond is actually a reality now. Put one of those engine blocks in the boat, Strap it in, launch it, pond sounds small enough you can just run a few ropes to shore to hold position. If there is a drain plug, pull it. You will probably get bored waiting for it to sink. If you have a pump handy, use it. Might get that cordless drill and a big wood bit. Do a little planning, make sure it is clean. Think about any air pockets (the bow is a likely place). A few vent holes to let the air out

    Just position it halfway decent and you won't need to move anything. You don't sink a boat then decide where you want it. That is just poor planning. Trying to run a lift bag on something as large as a boat isn't a simple recreational activity. There are dangers of failed rigging and being pinned under it. Sinking the boat is easy, plenty of boats have been sunk with a 6-pack by people who were not planning it.
     
    JackOfDiamonds likes this.
  2. diversteve

    diversteve moderatorem noster omnipotens

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
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    my thought also. You can even artistically match them side to side.

    If there's no water in the pond yet, now is the time to place it.

    No need to float it out on bags either if it still floats. More trouble than it's worth when you can control it with ropes - obviously allow enough extra for the depth.

    If it's a big enough boat it probably had a bilge which is now full of air so you need to drill holes thru the bottom - or the outer hull anyway.
     
  3. BackAfter30

    BackAfter30 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Denver
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    I’m surprise we got to page two before someone said...

    Pull the drain plug.

    If it’s remotely modern it has a drain plug. It doesn’t take long at all to fill a boat through the drain hole. Just ask any trailer boater; they’ve done it! If she is too old for a drain plug then I’m +1 on the 1” hole bored through her hull.

    (Appologies if I missed you saying she’s not seaworthy and you need some way to get her in position. )
     
  4. Londy

    Londy Banned

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    I trailer my boat and I've never forgotten to put in the drain plug, and I'd be willing to bet the vast majority of trailer boaters have never forgotten it either. Otherwise there'd be a lot of sunken boat accidents.
     
  5. BackAfter30

    BackAfter30 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Denver
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    Ever heard the old saw about motorcyclists? There are two kinds of riders; those who have laid it down, and those who WILL lay it down.
    Of course there is some hyperbole in there. The point is that you won’t have a bunch of sunken boats; they fill so quickly that you are unlikely to get so far from the launch ramp that you wouldn’t be able to manage the problem. If the boat is inherently negatively buoyant, a 1” hole will sink her just fine.
     
  6. Londy

    Londy Banned

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    If you forget to put in the drain plug, and the boat fills so fast that you aren't far from the ramp before it starts taking on water- it's going to be a very difficult problem to manage. Depending on the size of the boat, once you've got a significant amount of water onboard, the stern will drop and the boat will likely roll, allowing water to come in over the transom and the sides, then you're trying to bail out the ocean. Doesn't matter at that point if you're 2' from the dock or 2 miles, as far as managing the issue. The engine will be swamped, whether it's an outboard or I/O or inboard and ruined. regardless of whether the boat is positively buoyant or not.

    Although the salvage operation will be less complicated on the ramp as compared to offshore.
     
  7. JackOfDiamonds

    JackOfDiamonds Barracuda

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Israel
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    Putting it in place before filling the water will be a pain in the ass im afraid as the incline is very steep and getting a crane in there to lift the boat is virtually impossible.
    The pond is already dug out , just waiting for final preparations and water fill.

    Would be a good idea but explosives are highly regulated around here and would require special permits from the government to buy and use.

    Im not a big boat expert but i dont recall seeing a drain plug (didint even know such a thing exists ) .

    Wouldn't the natural buoyancy keep it floating even if i pull the plug?

    She is definitely not sea worthy but she floats which i think is what matters most for me at the moment.


    Appreciate all the comments and tips by everyone !

    Hopefully by the next couple of weeks we will finish renovating the house and filling the pond allowing us to start working on sinking the boat. Ill post the progress & pics as it progresses.
     
  8. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Solo Diver

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    So the pond is empty and steep sided. Put the boat on the edge of the pond, good rope across it, hook it to a friends 4WD, let him pull it into place. You have gravity helping pull it into place.

    Wood is slightly buoyant. And some is so dense it will sink. Once water logged, it sinks. There is plenty of wood sitting on the bottom of lakes, rivers, ponds, oceans etc. as it gets heavy and sinks. That is why there are suggestions of adding some ballast. I prefer a stripped engine block as it has little positive buoyance in the water. All those cylinder bores, cam bores, water jackets, etc. make great nurseries and hiding spots. It also looks more correct sitting in a boat compared to a bunch of rocks.
     

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