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Submerged skeletal remains recovery -

Discussion in 'Ideas and Stories' started by redrover, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. redrover

    redrover Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Kailua-Kona, Hawaii
    1,313
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    If I’ve posted this question poorly please move it to the correct location.
    I was very active in SAR prior to moving here and all water recoveries I was involved in, and heard about come to think if it, were accomplished by divers. I’m curious about the mechanics of robotic (I’m interpreting) skeletal remains recovery as spoken of in bodies, more bodies and another body. How is this accomplished; considering the fluidity and drag of water combined with degraded bone to bone connections? And additional complications of resting surface such as boulders, aquatic plants, mixed rock and sediment?

    All I can think of is some sort of electronic controlled clamshell of sorts along the lines of a Scoop Litter. Wouldn't any movement stir up sediment blinding the mechanical eye just as a divers?
    Or more simply if less delicately phrased; how does it gather up all those little parts and keep them contained? also, there must be something happening I cannot see to move to a shallower depth and then bag for the surface.
     
  2. Gary D.

    Gary D. ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Post Falls, Idaho
    4,367
    45
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    Ref this thread, it's fresh water so we have a lot more time. Each body of water is different but they stay together much longer than in the brine.

    Gary D.:wink:
     
  3. redrover

    redrover Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Kailua-Kona, Hawaii
    1,313
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    So I’ve simply misinterpreted ‘skeletal’ to be literally bone with no soft tissue’ and far more decomposed than could be recovered other than picking up the pieces by hand? A ROV would be more like a visually guided grappling hook process? I’m still impressed after 11 years a human would remain intact enough to raise 60’. Perhaps reading more carefully; “they hoped to raise it mechanically“, and, Strawberry Reservoir is very cold.
     
  4. james croft

    james croft Solo Diver

    1,633
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    Cold and deep bodies often stay remarkably intact. There is also the possibility in warmer waters under certain conditions where soft tissue "saponify". Saponify means to "the process of making soap". This can occur once the body begins to decompose and the layer of skin has come off or water gets underneath it. This exposes the fat on the victim's body and hydrolysis occurs. This creates fatty acids and they combine with other chemicals ions in the body such as calcium and ammonium to form an insoluble soap. This leads to a condition where this spreads to various fat deposits on the body involving the adipocere layer. This helps prevent the body from totally decomposing. Other organisms aid in this process. I once watched a video of an autopsy of a man who had turned to soap. He had been underwater for a very long time. Not sure but I want to say about 18 years or so. Pretty interesting process.
     
  5. havnmonkey

    havnmonkey Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: WPB, FL
    546
    28
    28
    mmm. CSI'ish :bananalama: <--- I don't know I just liked it.
     

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