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That endless Sargassum problem

Discussion in 'Marine Life and Ecosystems' started by chillyinCanada, Aug 20, 2019.

  1. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

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    АлександрД and KathyV like this.
  2. Saniflush

    Saniflush ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Will be in the area next weekend and am curious to see and talk to the local folks about it.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  3. HalcyonDaze

    HalcyonDaze Manta Ray

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    Location: Miami
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    The main issue where it's washing up here in FL is dealing with the sargassum without impacting turtle hatching season. So far at least protecting nests and hatchlings have rightly taken priority over shoveling sargassum, but I have to wonder how something like the boat and trailer arrangement mentioned would avoid bycatch.

    That said, where it piles up it's definitely nasty stuff. On seagrass monitoring events off Smathers Beach in Key West it collects between the riprap groins, and when I was last there in June the water leaking into my mask reeked of hydrogen sulfide.
     
  4. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

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    Leaving it there keeps the hatchlings from being able to make it to the sea and floating beds of it at the shore line can cause them to die even if they've made it.

    From what I've seen so far, the system that seems to works the best is the floating harvester. I don't know what it's really called.
     
  5. drbill

    drbill The Lorax for the Kelp Forest Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Santa Catalina Island, CA
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    We have a different Sargassum problem on the West Coast. Sargassum horneri first invaded our waters in 2004 (Catalina in 2006). I tried to get the California Dept. of Fish & Game to do something about it early on but they ignored it. Now it is found from at least Morro Bay in central California to Guadalupe Island off Baja. It has pretty much destroyed so many of my favorite dive sites as it out-competes our native giant kelp as well as other algae, and few species benefit from it. We tried getting a permit to remove it from marine protected areas but no go.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  6. Wookie

    Wookie Secret Field Agent ScubaBoard Business Sponsor

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    I wonder if it's beneficial in cooling the ocean. Saw a map yesterday that the hottest part of the ocean, in the Atlantic anyway, is also loaded with Sargassum.
     
  7. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

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    That's an interesting question!
     
  8. tarponchik

    tarponchik Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: USA
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    It's a good trap for CO2, isn't it?
     
  9. gopbroek

    gopbroek Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lewisville TX
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    It may cause a failure of the Meso American reef. It's not just on the surface
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  10. tarponchik

    tarponchik Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: USA
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    So it should be collected and...turned into a biofuel? Or composted?
     

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