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Titanium scuba tank

Discussion in 'Tanks, Valves and Bands' started by BIG Tiggz, Apr 21, 2008.

  1. BIG Tiggz

    BIG Tiggz Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Cali.
    19
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    Yeah I know this is a James Bond kind of question but...

    Giving that price is no matter, I have not been able to find anything close to a titanium tank. I know that making it would be very different then normal tanks but I have a bad back and need light weight.



    So fire away on this topic.
     
  2. Randy43068

    Randy43068 Orca

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location:
    5,461
    132
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    Are you a TROLL??

    These tanks won't work with PP if you want NITROX!!

     
  3. Randy43068

    Randy43068 Orca

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location:
    5,461
    132
    0

    Not to mention the difficulty in making them, and who the hell could afford one or more??
     
  4. JahJahwarrior

    JahJahwarrior Solo Diver Staff Member

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: West Palm Beach, Fl
    3,596
    809
    113
  5. Jimmer

    Jimmer Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Brantford, Ontario
    2,933
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    Cousteau used Ti tanks for a while. One issue with Ti is that it is extremely notch sensitive, so if it was to get damaged in any way shape or form, that notch would become a stress riser. I believe I read that one of Cousteau's tanks did explode.

    Carbon wrapped aluminum is extremely lightweight, but very buoyant and you'd have to wear a lot of lead to sink.

    Buy a rebreather if you want lots of gas with low weight, it's likely the best option, and would be WAY more afforable than Ti tanks.
     
  6. Randy43068

    Randy43068 Orca

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location:
    5,461
    132
    0
    Yep..
     
  7. Clammy

    Clammy Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Los Angeles, CA USA
    1,345
    30
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    Well... if you can bling an iphone or ipod and charge ridiculous amounts of money for it.... there's gotta be SOME super rich fellow that wants a custom bling tank!
     
  8. SteveAD

    SteveAD Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives:
    Location: danvers,ma
    1,827
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    Anything lighter than Al would be counterproductive. An Al 80 near empty becomes positively bouyant and therefore requires that you add lead to keep it down. Getting the tank lighter means you need more lead.

    Potentially, given the strength of Ti, it would be possible to make a super high pressure tank (maybe 10k psi) and that would allow for the possibility of a 100cf tank the size of an al30 that might have favorable bouyancy characteristics, but there aren't that many 10k psi compressors out there.
     
  9. Jimmer

    Jimmer Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Brantford, Ontario
    2,933
    21
    38
    Cousteau's Ti tanks were 5ksi 20 or 30 years ago, pretty impressive all things considered.
     
  10. JahJahwarrior

    JahJahwarrior Solo Diver Staff Member

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: West Palm Beach, Fl
    3,596
    809
    113

    Bling isn't meant to be pressurized to 3kpsi and used in rough environments. In other words: filling an iphone to 3k psi and using it underwater will destroy the iphone.

    As also mentioned, when iphones are dropped they do not suddenly become an explosion hazard, whereas a nicked titanium tank might. Finally, using an iphone does not require that the user wear any more lead than the user of any other phone.
     

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