• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Transmitters on Short Hoses?

Discussion in 'Sidemount Diving' started by bradymsu, Apr 13, 2021.

  1. Scuba Client

    Scuba Client Banned

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Australia
    516
    67
    Just be wary that that some technical/recreational divers are given gifts as a means of promoting a new fad. A good diver should be comfortable with any equipment arrangement or adapt very quickly.
     
  2. hedonist222

    hedonist222 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dubai, AbuDhabi, United Arab Emirates
    676
    301
    Don't you think the tape may hinder transmission performance?
     
  3. bradymsu

    bradymsu ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA
    263
    100
    Transmitters have been around for a quarter century now. They aren't a new fad. They're steadily replacing mechanical SPGs the same way dive computers have largely replaced plastic dive tables. Transmitters are more dependable, more accurate, more durable, and more streamlined for sidemount than brass & glass SPGs. Although SPGs still have a couple advantages.

    While first generation transmitters often had connection issues, that's no longer the case. With the exception of a negligent diver failing to monitory battery life, it's rare for a modern transmitter to lose connection for more than a few seconds. Even if that rare case occurs and the transmitter should fail, the display turns to garbage and provides an obvious and immediate indication to turn the dive within the Rule of Thirds. In contrast, when mechanical gauges fail they tend to stick indicating more gas than is actually available, presenting a potentially dangerous situation by overestimating remaining gas.

    The transducer in a transmitter is accurate to within 2 bar/30 psi compared to the standard bourdon tube SPGs which are only accurate to within 15 bar/220 psi. That lack of SPG accuracy is a secondary reason recreational divers were taught to end a dive at 50 bar or 500 psi. The thick plastic shell and static internal parts of a transmitter are much more difficult to damage from impact stress than the glass face and moving mechanical parts of a SPG. For sidemount, the transmitter is tucked out of the way along the lower valve and tank neck and protected within the diameter of the tank rather than alongside it or above it. It is further protected by its position against the diver's body. For many divers, a transmitter is also easier to read on a backlit digital wrist-mounted computer than a SPG's analog glow-in-the-dark face on a short hose.

    The benefits of an SPG over a transmitter are no need for a battery (although the hose & spool must be maintained) and a significantly lower price point. A high quality SPG costs just 20% of the price of a transmitter (US$70 vs. US$350 not factoring in customs duties or taxes). SPGs can also be more comforting for people less at ease with technological change. It's this final point which causes some divers to use a SPG as "redundancy" to a transmitter where they would never place two SPGs on a sidemount tank.
     
  4. Mike1967

    Mike1967 Contributor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Victoria, Australia
    1,495
    723
  5. Scuba Client

    Scuba Client Banned

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Australia
    516
    67
    I'm not here to dissuade anyone from purchasing several transmitters for all their diving needs. You put in a different brand in a Shearwater and the battery life symbol fails to monitor how much time before you need a new battery. I use the ones that don't leak. SPGs running down the tank on sidemount is as streamlined as you get. 50 bar rule is for novice divers. 4 transmitters for 5 sets of regulators adds up in cost. As I mentioned on my last post, when an incident occurs everything will blur on screen. An SPG mounted on a shoulder D-ring (doubles) takes one glance to know exactly where you stand. I believe this is one reason why novice divers don't monitor consoles well. It's called information overload.
     
    DogDiver likes this.
  6. halocline

    halocline Solo Diver

    8,948
    3,312
    What are you talking about, if you don't mind me asking? Are you suggesting that the expert divers I was referring to are acting as influencers for a computer company that has an AI option?
     
  7. Mike1967

    Mike1967 Contributor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Victoria, Australia
    1,495
    723
    Don't try to unravel that mystery.
     
    DogDiver likes this.
  8. hedonist222

    hedonist222 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dubai, AbuDhabi, United Arab Emirates
    676
    301
    A guy dropped turned on his tank and dropped the spg from waist-height onto the boat floor.
    It shattered. And this was before the first dive of a two-tank dive (boat wouldn't be returning to shop after first dive).
    Luckily we managed to install the boat captain's emergency bcd spg on his first stage.
     
  9. scubadada

    scubadada Diver Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Philadelphia and Boynton Beach
    14,494
    10,921
    bradymsu likes this.
  10. Scuba Client

    Scuba Client Banned

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Australia
    516
    67
    Yes, I do recall quoting your post, but maybe you can clarify the expert divers you were referring too? My point was that instructors are given dive equipment to try out, and that influences novice divers into thinking it will be good for them without weighing up the pros and cons. An indirect way of marketing equipment. Any more queries you need to clarify?
     

Share This Page