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Truk Lagoon fish ID help

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by doctormike, Jan 14, 2017.

  1. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Hi,

    I went to Truk Lagoon this year (AWESOME trip!), and added a number of fish to my fish database. I had never been in the Pacific before (other than California and Seattle area), so many of these are new to me. I got the Humann and DeLoach "Reef Fish" book, and I was able to identify most of them, but there were some that I just wasn't sure about. Any ideas? Thanks!

    Here are the photos: Truk Lagoon fish ID

    Mike
     
    tridacna and Kim Hunter like this.
  2. DocVikingo

    DocVikingo Senior Member

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    Hey Mike,

    2. Surely of the fangblenny genus (Meiacanthus), but not yet certain of species.

    3. Spotted sharpnose puffer/ocellated toby (Canthigaster solandri)

    12. Sabre squirrelfish (Sargocentron spiniferum).

    More later.

    Cheers,

    Doc
     
    CajunDiva likes this.
  3. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Terrific, thanks so much!
     
  4. DocVikingo

    DocVikingo Senior Member

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    Hey Mike,

    Not sure about #9 being a yellowspotted trevally (Carangoides fulvoguttatus) as your photo shows dark spots above the lateral line and very dark/dusky anal, dorsal & tail fins. The yellowspotted trevally typically shows a few golden spots above the lateral line, while the dorsal and anal fins are dusky yellow with the pectoral and caudal fins being olive-yellow.

    It does indeed appear to be of the genus Carangoides, but I'm not sure we have the species nailed yet.

    I must say that IDing your photos is both challenging and good fun.

    Cheers,

    DocVikingo
     
  5. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Yup! That shot is really hardly worth being included, it's not a very good ID shot. I was more wondering about what it was, don't know if I'll put it in the final database... I can't see the lateral line very well at all, was more just going on the unusual blue lined fins.

    Glad you like the challenge!

    Mike
     
  6. tridacna

    tridacna ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    10 looks like a Green chromis. (Chromis Viridis)

    11 looks like a Yellow tail damsel (Chrysiptera parasema)

    8 could be a Talbot chromis (Not sure)

    Nice pics!
     
  7. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
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    Thanks! Here are my better Truk pix...

    I agree about #10. The Yellow tail damsel pix that I can find online and in the text seem to have a sharp demarcation between the yellow tail and the blue body, and that line is fairly far forward on the body. Also, the Talbot Damsels have a dorsal spot, which this one doesn't have.

    Mike
     

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