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Video at night with no lights

Discussion in 'Underwater Videography' started by FishResearch, Jul 24, 2019.

  1. FishResearch

    FishResearch Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Melbourne, FL
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    I am looking for advice on video at night, using an ROV, with no lights. This will be for filming a spawning aggregation of bonefish. The good news is that they spawn in offshore waters in the tropics, so the water is very clear, and typically around the full moon. The bad news is they spawn at night at about 200' depth. My initial thought was to use infrared lights, and convert the ROV camera to infrared. Any thoughts, suggestions, advice, experience to share? Thanks.
    Aaron
     
  2. CuzzA

    CuzzA Solo Diver

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    Flir camera in a dry container.
     
  3. FishResearch

    FishResearch Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Melbourne, FL
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    Thanks. Might be able to mount this to the ROV, but then would still have the problem of being able to follow the fish using the ROV video feed.
     
  4. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: United States
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    You're going to want an I2-based camera system, not a thermal system. Think "IR Camera" or night vision, not FLIR.

    This is what happens when you put a FLIR underwater.
     
    CuzzA likes this.
  5. CuzzA

    CuzzA Solo Diver

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    Wow, I didn't expect that. They work so well right on the surface.
     
  6. FishResearch

    FishResearch Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Melbourne, FL
    4
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    Great demonstration. Thanks.
     
  7. FishResearch

    FishResearch Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Melbourne, FL
    4
    0
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    So based on comments here and in another forum, it looks like I have to go with a camera that is super light-sensitive. Now I begin the search for that expertise. Thanks for the feedback.
     
  8. Oitzu

    Oitzu Regular of the Pub

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    You need a camera that is IR sensitive. Basicly all cameras are IR sensitive but a IR filter is added to the lense.
    Maybe you have already a camera that could be "converted" with a lense without an IR filter?
    If you have that you can use IR-lights to illuminate the area.
     

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