• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Vintage hard hat try-out dive...

Discussion in 'Vintage Diving & Equipment' started by Fibonacci, Mar 20, 2021.

  1. Fibonacci

    Fibonacci Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    664
    701
    Yesterday I fulfilled a long-held wish to try standard dress hard hat diving!
    This one was a vintage Japanese TOA.

    With the able help of HDS members we had a fully supervised pool session... holy crap that rig is just as claustrophobic, heavy and unwieldy as it looks :eek:

    IMG_6620.JPG

    IMG_6618.JPG
    But underwater you can finely control buoyancy via the rubberised canvas suit and a head-actuated dump valve inside the helmet...
    I can see why SCUBA was invented :D

    Now for a modern Kirby Morgan Type 37...
     
  2. Wibble

    Wibble Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK
    470
    322
    Amazing!

    Is the black umbilical comms of some description?
     
  3. Fibonacci

    Fibonacci Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    664
    701
    Yep this particular rig had comms setup as it was used by HDS to train new divers...
    I must admit being able to talk to the attendants when the face port was screwed closed helped quell my rising feelings of anxiety even before I entered the water :wink:
     
    Sam Miller III and Marie13 like this.
  4. Wibble

    Wibble Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK
    470
    322
    Often wondered if you have to be upright when wearing Standard Dress. I suppose the suit to helmet flange is pretty gas proof. Do you adjust the flow of gas into the helmet?

    How could you scratch your nose in the helmet?!? Hey, what about equalising as you can't squeeze your nose?

    Really impressed though :)
     
  5. Fibonacci

    Fibonacci Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    664
    701
    The 'corselet' is firmly clamped to the rubberised canvas suit collar then the helmet goes on via an interrupted thread and seals onto a rubber ring... gas and watertight.

    Hmm... no chance of scratching but good point re equalising!
    Seems nose clips were commonly used.
    With the Kirby Morgan unit we also tried earlier they have a small rod that operates a Y shaped rubber covered projection that you can sort-of wedge your nose into and equalise.
    Didn't get a pic of that but the modern Kirby Morgan Type 37 seems to have a similar accessory...
    Kirby Morgan Type 37 web.JPG
    Kirby Morgan nasal block.JPG

    Air supply is controlled via the valve near my right hand, suit inflation/buoyancy is controlled via a valve at the back of the helmet. A large brass mushroom shape inside the lower rear RHS is tapped with the side of your head and the air escapes. A little tricky at first but quite easy underwater, and keeps your hands free.

    Make sure to keep on good terms with the guys on the pump :D

    IMG_6619.JPG

    Hand pump.jpeg
     
  6. Marie13

    Marie13 Great Lakes Mermaid ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Great Lakes
    8,414
    6,918
    Thanks for posting.
     
    Fibonacci likes this.
  7. axxel57

    axxel57 Solo Diver

    704
    508
    Whow!
    How cool is that?!
    Congrats!
    Could you use your suit as a BCD to get up again if you should stumble and fall, or do the guys above water would have to pull you up?
     
    Fibonacci likes this.
  8. Fibonacci

    Fibonacci Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    664
    701
    Once you get the hang of suit inflation/venting you can control your buoyancy to a surprising degree.
    Utterly dependent on your attendants getting into or out of the water!
     
    axxel57 and Sam Miller III like this.
  9. happy-diver

    happy-diver Skindiver Just feelin it

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: knowone here!
    1,925
    1,234
    Is that Taylor and Williams on the pump, crap everyone's ageing man

    Magnificent!
     
    Fibonacci likes this.
  10. Fibonacci

    Fibonacci Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    664
    701
    Sadly true for us all... but a great day!
    IMG_6623.JPG
     
    Searcaigh likes this.

Share This Page