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What stung me? (Picture Posted)

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by got4boyz, Apr 21, 2004.

  1. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    5,018
    90
    48
    Christmas Tree Worms are sedentary worms. Who the blazes told you they were hydroids? I'll fix 'em...

    A lot of open water siphonophores resemble little chains. And if it's not those things, you can have freshly detached tentacles from all sorts of other nasties be perfectly viable for several days until they bang into something.
    The green algaa Acetabularia is often confused with underwater mushrooms or some odd form of soft coral. They're common name is the Mermaid's wine cup/wine glass.
     
  2. got4boyz

    got4boyz Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Driggs, Idaho, United States
    407
    0
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    Sorry Archman, my mistake. Here is a paragraph taken from the link that crispos posted. I skimmed through it the first time and misunderstood the Christmas Tree reference. I don't know what they meant by that statement though.

    "Hydrozoans are the "other" Class of cnidarians (Anthozoans making up the mainly polypoid corals, anemones, sea fans... and Scyphozoans the "real" Jellyfishes that live most of their lives as medusas, inverted bell-shapes). Most of the Hydrozoans are small, obscure not-so funny to touch Christmas tree sort of affairs, but they include such notables as Portuguese Man of War, Fire Corals (Millepora), and the beautiful delicate Stylasterines (Lace Corals) amongst their ranks."

    That's a great way to describe them. Segments. They were probably less than an inch long and smaller than the diameter of a pencil lead divided into several segments. Thousands of them!

    What's the common name for them?

    What do you mean by free-floating stage? My first thought was that they were broken off of something else. Jellyfish start out as larva? I'm learning all kinds of interesting stuff here! :dance:

    Thanks all.
     
  3. crispos

    crispos Instructor, Scuba

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    We are going to start charging you for the Reef I.D. specialty course, Beth... :eyebrow:

    Post some more pictures, it sharpens us up.
     
  4. got4boyz

    got4boyz Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Driggs, Idaho, United States
    407
    0
    0
    Too funny crispos. But of course that's why I ask the questions here because I know someone can answer them without any trouble! LOL

    I didn't want to be to bothersome though, so I wasn't going to post the next two pictures I had questions about, but since you asked, here they are. :wink:

    OK, I lied, I have three more pics. What's the beautiful yellow, fern-like looking thing the queen angel is behind? And what are the other two of. They look like plants, but I'm guessing they probably aren't!

    Thanks, and what do I owe ya? :D
     
  5. H2Andy

    H2Andy Blue Whale

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: NE Florida
    29,646
    376
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    the last two are anemones (both animals) i am pretty sure.

    the first one is a hydroid or a gorgonian? (arggggggggggghhhh i gotta get better
    at this) but either way, it's an animal too

    :wink:
     
  6. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    5,018
    90
    48
    Looks like you need to brighten up those photos! Anyways, these are all easy as pie, and I can "do them" off the top of my head.

    1. Nemaster, the common yellow Caribbean comatulid (featherstar) crinoid. Distantly related to starfish and their friends. They shy away from light. The tube feet are quite sticky but really cool to touch. Everyone should touch a comatulid at least once.

    2. Dichocoenia (flower coral). Usually a pretty yellow or green colour when WELL LIT. Don't touch these things... you'll mess up their slime coat and piss them off. Rude parrotfish may attempt to eat them.

    3. Condylactis gigantea (Caribbean purple or pink clubbed anemone). Great in aquariums, and they DON'T STING. That's right, you can go right up to these suckers and touch 'em. Their "stinging cells" are of the sticky type, which you may find startling. By the way their tentacle tips can be not only purple or pink but virtually any colour of the rainbow.
     
  7. mbuff

    mbuff Angel Fish

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    still cool to see the pics. (I've never dove anywhere but the california coast, mostly north and never south of the channels) Thanks for posting them. I was going to guess crinoid on the first one, coral on the second (it looks calcareous) and anemone on the 3rd... but specific species are mostly beyond me when it comes to warm water stuff. Thanks for the specific ID Archman

    One of the first things to capture my imagination when I started diving was how so many "plant-like" things were actually animals... one of those bizarre, slightly twisted things I like about marine life: forms a bit "off" from terrestrial life. And the weirder the critter, the more I like it :)
     
  8. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    55,835
    23,177
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    Sea lice usually sting you when they "dry out", or if the get caught in a tight waist band. I usually find rinsing off on the boat will stop them from getting me.
     
  9. H2Andy

    H2Andy Blue Whale

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: NE Florida
    29,646
    376
    0
    3. Condylactis gigantea (Caribbean purple or pink clubbed anemone).

    hey, i got one right!
     
  10. got4boyz

    got4boyz Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Driggs, Idaho, United States
    407
    0
    0
    LOL Andy. Don't feel too bad, I don't even have a clue. At least you got one right. :)

    I need to buy alot of expensive books I guess for corals, sponges, jellyfish, etc. I'd love to know what they all are!


    Thanks Archman, you are totally amazing! If you're ever interested maybe you'd like to look at my online photo album and identify all my corals and sponges for me? :wink:
     

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