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What to wear immediately after a dive?

Discussion in 'Women's Perspectives' started by Kimela, Aug 31, 2019.

  1. NothingClever

    NothingClever ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
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    chillyinCanada likes this.
  2. ElizaDoolittle

    ElizaDoolittle Registered

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    As I said in my presentation here, I'm so much of a newcomer that I haven't taken my OWD course yet (it's due to start in two weeks' time).

    I was glad to see this thread here, as what to wear between and after dives is something that has always puzzled me. And that's something that may not be mentioned in the course!

    I assume we'll be using a wetsuit (edited because I said drysuit) during the course, maybe with some other layer below, depending on the weather (I have no idea how cold or warm the Mediterranean will be in early October, though I expect around 20ºC outside the water). We'll be doing two dives one after the other, and I had always thought we'd remain with the drysuit on between them, maybe with a windbreaker or a polar fleece on top of it if the weather is cold (suggestions?). And I had also assumed that we would be wearing that on our way back, too, and get changed someplace on land.

    But reading what you've written, I realise I may be wrong. It seems much more complex. I never wear skirts, dresses or pareos, I loathe shorts, and I'm the type who wears a T-shirt and jeans all the time. So this is the sort of stuff I'd have to change into.

    I had assumed that once on land, I would just put the T-shirt and jeans on over my half-wet swimming suit (a full one, since I've never been keen on bikinis), and go to the hotel and change into completely dry clothes. But if that's not possible, I suppose I'll die of a severe cold sooner or later, from walking around all day with a wet swimming suit on.

    But now I realise I may have to change clothes on the boat. The type of boats I've seen in the photos and videos from the diving school I'll be attending have no sort of toilet or private place, and at some point I suppose you must go stark naked so as to put a dry bra and knickers on, mustn't you?

    Funny how I hadn't thought of all this before!
     
  3. Scraps

    Scraps ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
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    I wouldn't know if the ladies go to such extremes. However, from time to time, ladies do request the gentlemen aboard to direct their attention for a couple minutes to some object outside the boat. We always comply, but have no idea what the ladies do while our backs are turned.
     
  4. drl

    drl Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Chicago suburbs
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    If you dive in a dry suit you won’t need to worry about changing out of a wet bathing suit. There may be some dampness from condensation but you won’t be wet.
    When I dive dry I usually wear a pair of compression shorts (like short leggings) and an exercise tank or sports bra under my jeans and tee, so I can change on the boat without flashing everyone.
     
    ElizaDoolittle likes this.
  5. Hank49

    Hank49 Solo Diver

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  6. DBPacific

    DBPacific ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
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    A large scarf, shawl, towel, or sarong is your friend if you need to change and there's no place on the boat for privacy. Just wrap it around your neck so it covers your shoulders and as much of what you're changing as possible, face the ocean, and change with your arms underneath the cloth. If I have to change I usually do in two parts: sarong around the upper body to change into a comfy bra and shirt, and then once that's done, untie it and retie around my waist to change into dry pants.

    If it's warm enough, I do just put on clothes over the wet swimsuit (keep a towel with you to dab the worst of it if it hasn't dried by the time you're back on land), but you can also just do the same principle I mentioned before with a large sweater/jacket, and a skirt.
     
    ElizaDoolittle likes this.
  7. DBPacific

    DBPacific ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: NorCal, USA
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    I would advise not making those jokes on the women's perspectives forum, or to any women diving with you.

    We get enough people trying to see up or past our clothes without being even more worried about it during a fun day of diving.
     
  8. Hank49

    Hank49 Solo Diver

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    My most humble apologies. See above edit.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  9. DBPacific

    DBPacific ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: NorCal, USA
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    Appreciated
     
    chillyinCanada and Hank49 like this.
  10. Esprise Me

    Esprise Me Kelp forest dweller Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
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    @ElizaDoolittle I would think you'd be wearing wetsuits, not drysuits, for your OW course. There are some very cold places where OW classes are done in a drysuit out of necessity, but I doubt that happens in the Mediterranean. If the air is 20C you'll probably be fine just putting your T-shirt and jeans over your wet swimsuit, as long as you have a good warm coat to put over that.
     
    ElizaDoolittle likes this.

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