• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

What's Done This?

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by FLL Diver, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. JRO

    JRO Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Shelton, Ct
    504
    1
    18
    Nice to know I'm not the only twisted monkey on the boards that has captured images of fish pooping.

    My "collection", includes a variety of Parrotfish (including one that appears to be making a strafing run), a majestic Queen Angel (more of a dangler), and the crown jewel was the recent Cuda that made sure I was paying attention during a safety stop in T&C (that was when I decided it was a collection). He came right at the camera to within about a foot, pulled a neat little half circle to give me a wonderful profile shot and then dropped a bomb...

    Now it's just a matter of growing the collection (gotta keep an eye out for fish that look like they're a bit distressed) and picking out the perfect music...maybe, Always look on the bright side of life from Monty Pythons Life of Brian....
     
  2. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    55,915
    23,287
    113
    And a collection like that might just "grow"... eeewwweeeeeeeeeeeeee! :D
     
  3. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    5,018
    90
    48
    Argh! Doesn't anybody know what a phycologist is anymore? Oh poo... ha ha, I said poo.

    A little story about "weed".

    Back before science was popular and butchered by the media, folks called scientists prowled the coral reefs. They looked at the fishes, corals, and other critters in a balanced, holistic manner curiously lacking in today's world. Many of these scientists were of the more exciting "I study fishes" type. These people watched parrotfishes poo clean sand all over the reef and thought "AHA! That's where all this pretty carbonate sand comes from!"
    Of course, being fish people, they neither cared nor understood much of anything else going on at the reef. But being "popular" scientists, they spread this gross exaggeration of parrotfish pooping prowess far and wide, where it was hailed by the non-scientists as gospel and placed on the internet, where it was written as gospel.

    Enter the marine ecologist, whose job is to integrate many aspects of marine science to build a cohesive picture of the functional community. Thoroughly examining the studies of not just fish people but other scientists, marine ecologists discover a small and often overlooked cadre of researchers, the marine botanists (AKA phycologists). Their purview is the similarly underrated and overlooked world of algae and plants. All along botanists knew that many species of tropical algae incorporated calcium carbonate into their tissues, and when they died episodically their skeletons disassociated into mass piles of sand. Botanists also took stock of the huge abundance of these plants, far more common than corals or even those dang fishes that got all the media attention. They calculated that the bulk of biologically formed carbonate sand in tropical areas came not from parrotfish poo (which was never well quantified anyway), but from the lowly seaweeds. The phycologists whispered this grand secret to their pals the marine ecologists (who always liked them as much as the fish people... more even), where it was disseminated in many of the better texts and journals. Alas many of the fish people never read these, or if they did, felt indignant about having all the attention going to miserable plants, however justified. Hence the stubborn persistence of parrotfish poo in the general literature today.
     
  4. JRO

    JRO Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Shelton, Ct
    504
    1
    18
    First the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, then Santa and now this!?!?!?

    and I thought I'd come up with a title....BUILDING A REEF.

    Back to the drawing board...
     
  5. Scubakevdm

    Scubakevdm ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    4,803
    157
    63
    I think that's where I fell into the water and landed on my left ear. I didn't think that the earprint would survive that long. Interesting.
     
  6. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    5,018
    90
    48
    Ha ha, our upper Texas beaches often aren't dominated by SAND at all, but rather silts and clays (sourced via river discharges). The sand fraction usually never gets higher than 50%, and can quite often constitute a piddly 30% of the total sediment fraction.

    Silts and clays settle out much slower than sand particles, so if you kick this junk up it stays up for freaking forever. Also, finer particles have a better retention for detritus (organic particles), which readily stains and discolours water. If you've ever snorkeled underneath mangroves you've likely encountered stained water.

    The upper Texas coast gets a lot of the Mississippi-derived sediments, in addition to those from our many rivers in the area (Trinity, Sabine, San Jacinto, Brazos, Colorado, etc.). These aren't clean sparkling rivers by any means.

    As you move down the Texas coast the river effects dwindle, and by the time you hit North Padre the sand fraction becomes king again. Water starts to clear up; Mansfield Pass is often good enough to snorkel (if you can get out there). The beaches at South Padre are structurally distinct from those of Galveston, beach renourishment notwithstanding.
     
  7. got4boyz

    got4boyz Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Driggs, Idaho, United States
    407
    0
    0
    Thanks for explaining that to me. Texas rivers (or at least the ones around here) are the dirtiest rivers I've ever seen. I grew up in Idaho that has beautiful, cold, clear rivers so it's pretty sad to have to be around those here. But we don't have gators in Idaho either, and they're kinda fun! :)

    So is there any diving at Mansfield Pass or South Padre? I need a good, clear place to dive that's not too far away!
     
  8. Rick Murchison

    Rick Murchison Trusty Shellback Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Gulf of Mexico
    13,348
    552
    113
    Sure...
    Just head offshore a few miles and pick a rig.
    Varies from day-to-day, but generally anything more than six miles out is reasonable.
    Rick
     
  9. marinebio

    marinebio Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: sri lanka
    36
    0
    6
    My 2 cents as a geologist, Aragonite is the early form of the mineral called Calcite which is made mostly of calcium and carbonate - CaCO3 - the CO3 comes from CO2 dissolved in the water from the atmosphere - thereby removing it and helping slow the "greenhouse" effect. Marine critters that make shells from CaCO3 usually create the mineral Aragonite first (crystal structure is slightly different than Calcite) which then changes into Calcite after the critter dies. Limestone is the rock made mostly of Calcite... and superheated/compressed Limestone turns into Marble....
     
  10. got4boyz

    got4boyz Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Driggs, Idaho, United States
    407
    0
    0
    Welcome to ScubaBoard Marinebio!
     

Share This Page