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Who are the marine scientists on this forum?

Discussion in 'Marine Science and Physiology' started by WinfieldNC, Sep 16, 2019.

  1. WinfieldNC

    WinfieldNC Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cary, NC
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    I started working at a university in NC three years ago after 15+ in the biotech industry. I am staff not faculty. I work as a molecular biologist on plant viruses. One of the perks of working at a university is the ability to take free classes so I enrolled in our Marine Science program and started working toward another BS. During this time I requested to be added to the group of marine scientists on this forum. My workload increased and I didn't have the time to pursue the marine science degree so I dropped out of the group for marine scientists because I didn't want to misrepresent myself.

    I am curious as to who the marine scientists are on this forum and in what capacity? Is it by degree, a hobby or by profession?
     
  2. Jack Hammer

    Jack Hammer Solo Diver

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    If you subscribe to that forum the site gives you a "Marine Scientist" header
     
  3. WinfieldNC

    WinfieldNC Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cary, NC
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    I realize that but I was curious about members individual qualifications, jobs, fields of study, etc.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  4. drbill

    drbill The Lorax for the Kelp Forest Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Santa Catalina Island, CA
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    Semi-retired marine ecologist here. Studied marine phycology and kelp forest ecology in grad school (UCSB) years ago and ecology as an undergrad (Harvard). Although I did some research and have published several peer-reviewed papers, my main focus has been education.
     
    chillyinCanada and WinfieldNC like this.
  5. DBPacific

    DBPacific Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Oregon, USA
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    I'm a student, so give me 6 years to finish undergrad and a PhD and then I can say I'm a full on marine scientist
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  6. RyanT

    RyanT Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Maryland
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    Depending on where you are in your U/G program, 6 years might be a bit ambitious. These days 6 years is not unusual just for the Ph.D. Don't be in a hurry simply for the sake of the degree. Take in everything you can along the way!

    Back to the original question, I'm a faculty member studying animal sensory ecology, cognition, and evolutionary biology. Most of my work is terrestrial though.
     
  7. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
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    It takes 6 years for the typical bachelors' degree now at many universities, with so many students taking lighter class loads so they can work/play on phone/vape.

    But I was enrolled in college for over 15 years so I really shouldn't complain.
     
    chillyinCanada and Johnoly like this.
  8. diversteve

    diversteve Technical Admin

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location:
    26,197
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    tursiops is:
    Marine Scientist and Master Instructor
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  9. DBPacific

    DBPacific Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Oregon, USA
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    I don't think I've ever met a bachelor's student who took 6 years at the same institution. Took some years, then transferred or took some years, took off time, and went back to finish or pursue a different degree. 6 years is becoming more typical for a PhD but 4 years is, I think, still the average for bachelor's. Despite what the news might make people think, colleges aren't simply fancy buildings within which to vape and play around
     
    chillyinCanada and RyanT like this.
  10. Seaweed Doc

    Seaweed Doc Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle, Washington State, USA
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    I'm another phycologist. On faculty at a small private university. I work on the causes and consequences of macroalgal blooms.

    I'll also second @RyanT s comment on time to PhD, at least in the Americas. I took 8 years, though started to soon as a precocious 20 year old. (I also taught full time the last 3 years.). A friend was making good progress yet was 10 years into her program.
     

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