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Who's eye is this? number 3

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by Uncle Pug, Sep 22, 2005.

  1. ToddMH

    ToddMH Angel Fish

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    Actually, if you could look into that eye with a little underwater opthalmoscope, do you know what you'd see?...

    Ohhhhh...Busted!
     
  2. Uncle Pug

    Uncle Pug Swims with Orca ScubaBoard Supporter

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    I think I would probably see myself looking into that little eye with an ophthalmoscope.
     
  3. ToddMH

    ToddMH Angel Fish

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    Bingo!
     
  4. Uncle Pug

    Uncle Pug Swims with Orca ScubaBoard Supporter

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    In Googling scallop eyes I just found a very interesting (and disturbing) photo of a scallop rubbing it's eye with a finger after someone in the lab had lifted its retina with a pair of scissors.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. ToddMH

    ToddMH Angel Fish

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    I've seen just such a photo taken with a dissecting microscope. The photo, and the rest of what little I know about scallop eyes, came from a book "Animal Eyes." It details the incredible diversity of optical mechanisms in the animal kingdom.

    As for the scallop retina, I should imagine that it is in front of the reflector. That is, that light passes through the retina, hits the mirror, and is then reflected back as an image on to the photoreceptors. The fact that it passes through the retina twice before hitting the photoreceptors is not as unusual as it may seem. In fact, even in our own retinas the photoreceptor layer is the _deepest_ layer of the retina such that light must pass through several layers of neurons before it hits the photoreceptors. As these layers are essentially transparent they don't unacceptably distort the image. I would guess that a scallop eye could do the same.
     
  6. Snowbear

    Snowbear NOK ScubaBoard Supporter

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    :frown:
     
  7. Marek K

    Marek K Loggerhead Turtle

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    Man, Pug, that full image is weird... looks like the guy is looking at us with all those eyes, grinning like Jack Nicholson...

    And upside down it looks like... well...
     
  8. Uncle Pug

    Uncle Pug Swims with Orca ScubaBoard Supporter

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    They come in a variety of colors and addition decorations.
    This is Lavender:
    [​IMG]

    This Harry:
    [​IMG]

    And this is Mick:
    [​IMG]
     

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