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Trip Report Why I Won't Be Returning to Cozumel-Part 1,2&3

Discussion in 'Cozumel' started by living4experiences, Apr 24, 2021.

  1. Streydog

    Streydog Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: DFW, TX
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    In South Tx during highschool during 2 a -days they would not have water for us, they would give us crushed ice and we would need to suck on it, so we would not drink too fast. We also had a salt tablet dispensor by the water fountain in the locker room. I worked for the highway department as well and we would take salt tablets there too.
     
  2. ggunn

    ggunn ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Austin, TX, USA
    11,177
    4,341
    In response to: "The dive guides in Mexico don't care if you're on air or Nitrox."
    That depends on how the comment was meant. If it was intended to say that the DMs do not have a preference as to which gas you are diving, I agree with the statement. If it was intended that they are oblivious to it, I do not.
     
  3. Dan

    Dan ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
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    As long as DM and divers use the same gas and everyone is diving on the same dive profile, DM would know if you are violating the NDL or not.

    If I violated my NDL, my SUUNTO D4 would lock out, but my Shearwater Teric would just warn me that I’m a bad boy and not lock out.
     
    Esprise Me likes this.
  4. ggunn

    ggunn ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Austin, TX, USA
    11,177
    4,341
    Sometimes there is a mix of gases being dived, and that's OK as long as the DM sets up the dive on a conservative air profile or everyone is diving his correctly set computer.
     
  5. mediumone

    mediumone Contributor

    1,139
    474
    Huh? Bragging? You can't be serious.
    Simply a statement of fact.
     
  6. uncfnp

    uncfnp Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: North Carolina
    6,636
    5,420
    The DM’s don't care as in you are allowed to dive the gas you choose. For Coz that is typically air, 32 or 36. But the DM’s typically are aware which divers are air vs nitrox.

    In both Cozumel and Florida the boats I dive are often a varied group and each individual is responsible for their own NDLs.
     
    eleniel and gopbroek like this.
  7. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
    27,497
    20,893
    As is true of all gross generalizations, it cannot be true in all cases.

    Looking back on my own experiences, I am pretty sure that the DMs were always aware of what I was using. In many cases, it did not matter that much because I was the only one using nitrox, but there were many dives where it did matter. In what was probably the most memorable dive in my history in Cozumel, we could not do the dive if we were not on nitrox. In other cases, those of us on nitrox were warned that the dive would come close to our MOD, and we should act appropriately.

    A couple decades ago, the standard procedure for most Cozumel operators was to allow nitrox only on one of the dives on a 2-tank dive. On one occasion, the DM would not allow me to use my single nitrox tank on the first dive, because the planned maximum depth was 80 feet and my MOD was 110. He was afraid I would lose buoyancy control and plummet all the way past my MOD and instantly die an agonizing death. It was just too dangerous, he said in his stern lecture.
     
    Esprise Me and drrich2 like this.
  8. Lorenzoid

    Lorenzoid DIR Practitioner Staff Member

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Atlanta, USA
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  9. ggunn

    ggunn ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Austin, TX, USA
    11,177
    4,341
    Of course these are sweeping "us and them" generalizations which were created by those from the "first world" and which are pretty much meaningless. Every country has areas that are "civilized" as well as those that are not.
     
    Lorenzoid and boulderjohn like this.
  10. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
    27,497
    20,893
    I recommend one of the most powerful books I ever read--Howard Gardner's Leading Mind's: An Anatomy of Leadership.

    Gardner makes what at first seems to be an obvious statement--An effective leader communicates well with his or her audience. He then goes on to the more complex (and startling) conclusion that with a highly diverse audience, you have to be as effective as possible to all segments, which is close to impossible. The mistake potential leaders make, especially highly intelligent people, is ignoring a specific segment of that diverse audience, a segment that turns out to be the most important. They are the people whose outlook on life is frozen at what child development scientist Jean Piaget identified as the 5-year old mind. At the 5-year old level, children typically see the world in extremes. Things are black or white, good or bad, right or wrong, etc. It is not until they get older that they can recognize gray areas--the complexities that truly mark the way our world works. Sadly, some people never get over that 5-year old thinking, and Gardner says those people form the most critical portion of the audience, particularly in a voting audience.

    For those people, once they have categorized something as good, no attribute of it can ever be even slightly bad. Once something has been determined to be bad, no part of it can ever be good. Potential leaders too often ignore that segment of the population because they dismiss their thinking as simplistic and not worth mentioning. The effective leader, however, must be sure to address that segment of the audience, even if it means, in essence, lying through oversimplification. You can see it in politicians who do understand it, leaders, for example, who refer to the forces of good opposing the evil-doers, telling the world of the need to confront the axis of evil, because we cannot let that evil prevail. When a leader describes the true complexity of a situation, the 5-year old mind perceives it as a lie, an attempt to hide the truth.
     

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