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Yellowtail Jack?

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by couv, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. couv

    couv Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: 13th floor of the Ivory Tower
    4,702
    1,969
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    Hello All,

    This little rascal attacked me every time I passed near a certain area of "his" rig.
    It was yesterday 26 June 10, about 40 ft deep on an oil rig ~ 24 miles south of Freeport, TX

    Please ID this feisty character for me.

    Thank you,

    Couv

    [​IMG]
     
  2. redacted

    redacted Guest

    Oops, I missed the picture.. Yes., perhaps yellow jack. I have seen them at FGB on occasion. but the bar through the eye & small dorsal suggests Amberjack. They all look the same once they are fillets.
     
  3. deborahdelamar

    deborahdelamar Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Cozumel, MX
    1,352
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    83
    Looks like an Almaco jack, Seriola rivoliana aka: Longfin Yellowtail, which is not the plain ol' Yeller jack. Same family as species lalandi aka Yellowtail Jack & dumerili aka Greater Amberjack, which is longer & sleeker.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2010
  4. Sully3

    Sully3 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: New Jersey
    504
    61
    28
    yep, definitely an almaco jack
     
  5. ryan115

    ryan115 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: St. Petersburg, FL
    139
    14
    18
    How big would you say that he is...looking at the picture I would guess about 12"-18"
    At smaller sizes juvenile Seriola are a serious pain.
    Based on the dorsal and anal fin lengths (hard to really tell in that picture) but they dont really look to be long, which would make it Seriola rivoliana, I am leaning more torwards either Greater or Lesser AJ, Seriola dumerili or Seriola fasciata
     
  6. deborahdelamar

    deborahdelamar Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Cozumel, MX
    1,352
    366
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    Ryan - I ruled out the amberjacks because of the height of the back above center -- amberjacks have less up top than below -- and because this fish seems to be older than I originally thought -- there are no transitional blotches on it. The only adult that fits that, in my analyis, is the Almaco. (I've never seen a young AJ in the field -- only really beeg ones -- so I don't have in-water experience to guide me.)
    I don't think we can really use the anal fin length in this action shot. The other fins seem consistent with Almaco to me.
    Whatd'ya think about this reasoning?
     
  7. couv

    couv Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: 13th floor of the Ivory Tower
    4,702
    1,969
    113
    Folks, this guy was small; I would say 9-10 inches. One thing making the ID difficult for me is the yellow in the tail and anal fins. Perhaps that's not an important item. After reading your post, I searched through several web sites to find a picture to help ID it, but the yellow in the tail section has me flummoxed. The closest picture I've found has my untrained eye leaning toward the Lesser Amberjack http://www.charlestonfishing.com/fishid.asp but ddeborahdelamar's picture looks pretty close too except the body on my fish seemed to have a bit less hump.

    Couv
     
  8. ryan115

    ryan115 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: St. Petersburg, FL
    139
    14
    18
    I will try to find some pictures at work tomorrow of some little Seriola that we have confirmed the ID on.
     
  9. couv

    couv Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: 13th floor of the Ivory Tower
    4,702
    1,969
    113
  10. ryan115

    ryan115 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: St. Petersburg, FL
    139
    14
    18
    You rarely see the first dorsal fin of Jacks, they have a depression that the fin folds down in to, which makes them more hydrodynamic. Here a 2 pictures that I found

    Seriola dumerili
    [​IMG]

    Seriola rivoliana
    [​IMG]

    Sorry about the sideways picture...photobucket is not playing nice
     

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