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You talkin' t' meee???

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by Rick Murchison, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. Rick Murchison

    Rick Murchison Trusty Shellback Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Gulf of Mexico
    13,348
    552
    113
    The fish with the common name "Batfish" in the Pacific and the fish with the common name "Batfish" in the Atlantic aren't even remotely related...

    Atlantic:
    ... Family Ogcocephalidae (Batfishes)
    ... Order Lophiiformes (Anglerfishes)
    ... Class Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)

    Pacific:
    ... Family Ephippidae (Spadefish (Bat fish))
    ... Order Perciformes (perch-like fishes)
    ... Class Actinopterygii

    Rick
     
  2. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    5,018
    90
    48
    Well, there are some pacific ogcocephalids referred to as "batfish". There's one in the Galapagos, for example. Some of the aussie types also get tagged as "batfish" in lieu of the older "moonfish" or "handfish" names.

    Other families besides the ephippids and ogcocephalids also get the tag. Common names suck.:eyebrow:
     
  3. Rick Murchison

    Rick Murchison Trusty Shellback Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Gulf of Mexico
    13,348
    552
    113
    Yeah, but they're easier to spel.
    Rick :D
     
  4. Hank49

    Hank49 Solo Diver

    6,829
    1,776
    113
    That's a great photo Rick. Those look to be in the "difficult to spot" magnitude of frogfish or ghost pipe fish.
     
  5. Rick Murchison

    Rick Murchison Trusty Shellback Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Gulf of Mexico
    13,348
    552
    113
    These are not usually too hard to spot as they transit the sandy flats, but getting a face-shot is hard because they're very shy of the camera and will turn away nearly every time you try to get into position. I was lucky to have daughter Cary along on this dive to help get him to face the camera. They are indeed anglerfishes - like frogfish.
    Rick
     

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