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Yuri accident

Discussion in 'New Divers and Those Considering Diving' started by TatianaSilva, Jul 12, 2014.

  1. TatianaSilva

    TatianaSilva Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Gravesend, United Kingdom
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    im not exactly giving my opinion about the tv show , the thing is , me, as a new diver who have just discovered it , i try to watch , read and ask anything related to diving if i want to do it as a future job because i have too many things to learn. And if we keep in mind that diving tv shows are not common, i may as well watch all of them :wink:

    so, i have done the OP in a completely different place from UK . Do you think i should have a dry suit course or a few dives in pool with it first ?
     
  2. String

    String Master Instructor

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Grand Cayman
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    The course is standardised - basic diving physics is taught at the same point of every course everywhere you do it.

    Drysuit course is a confined session then gentle open water dives. It is a little bit different from a wetsuit and in my view the earlier in your diving experience you do it the better as you don't need to unlearn wetsuit habits. Contrary to what lots of people claim, it's not rocket science or in any way difficult. In fact, its easier than a stupidly thick, compressible wetsuit.

    You can do a drysuit orientation pretty much anywhere in the UK. It's worth doing before you think about buying one so you have an idea of what type you might actually want to buy.
     
    tracydr likes this.
  3. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
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    Even if you keep decently warm in your wetsuit during the dive, the big difference comes after sufacing. While the wetsuit guys start to shiver and slowly turn blue in the cold breeze, the drysuit divers are just fine.

    My first forty or so DS dives were in a snug neoprene DS. It was almost as easy to dive as a wetsuit. When I got myself a trilam suit with a thick undergarment, I needed about ten dives to be totally comfortable with it. The first half to dial in my weighting, the second half to get used to more air migration and slower venting due to the thick undergarment. I still prefer my neoprene DS when the water is warm(ish), because it's markedly easier to dive and I don't overheat as fast on land in summer temps.




    --
    Sent from my Android phone
    Typos are a feature, not a bug
     
  4. t4e

    t4e Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Burlington Ontario
    730
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    ok, i have to ask...what is OP?
    do you mean OW?
     
  5. kwinter

    kwinter Rebreather Pilot

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: South Jersey
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    Norway in a wet suit. I'm experiencing shrinkage just thinking about it.
     
  6. annasea

    annasea Solo Diver

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    OP = original poster
     
  7. Mossman

    Mossman Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: SoCal
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    Why would you do a safety stop if you are sharing air or having a problem? The last thing you want to do during an air share or problem is an optional safety stop.
     
  8. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    12,574
    8,965
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    Well, these days a drysuit isn't exactly the ideal solution either. 25-30 degrees (C, that's 75-85F) in the air makes for a rather sweaty experience before you splash, but around here it's still only around 10 degrees (C, that's 50F) below the thermocline.

    You get almost as wet in a drysuit as in a wetsuit. It's just that in a drysuit you get wet before you even enter the water...
     
  9. TSandM

    TSandM Missed and loved by many. Rest in Peace

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    We deal with the same problem here in Puget Sound. Right now, air temperatures during the day are running 80 to 90F. You learn to put your gear together before you suit up at all, then suit up very quickly, don gear, and get in the water to do gear checks. If you are delayed, you go to the water and get wet in the dry suit (especially your hair!) to keep cool.
     
    rwkosh likes this.
  10. t4e

    t4e Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Burlington Ontario
    730
    234
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    thanks, i know that...would help to read the post i quoted before answering, but by all means translate her comment then

    and from a different thread

     

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