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Freediving breath holds

Discussion in 'Snorkeling / Freediving' started by jasonliquid, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. jasonliquid

    jasonliquid Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: newport beach ca
    7
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    I was wondering what exercise is recommended to help with bottom time. I am getting around 1:20 and that's about it. I do run and work out but it doesn't seem like I can get past that mark. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. Andyblue

    Andyblue Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Melbourne Australia
    159
    0
    0
    Bump for interest. I was going to do a freediving course as soon as my fittness improves a little. I swim every night but need to start running too.
     
  3. stoyleg

    stoyleg Angel Fish

    # of Dives:
    Location: UK
    12
    0
    0
    exercise is obviously crucial, but practising breathing techniques and regular breath-holding (safely with a buddy) are just as important. Make sure you 'warm up' adequately, stretching as you would for other forms of exercise, and then take as long as you need to get in the 'zone' before going under. Don't push it initially and be sure to be 100% relaxed, come up and breathe slowly and controlled for ~3mins then go again. Do this for an hour or two and you should notice improvement (do it with someone though and make sure you establish safety protocols between you). Relaxation is key.

    Practising CO2 and O2 tables in a pool will help, but the best way is to just go as often as possible - you'll quickly find you improve beyond 1:20 - most people should be able to get at least 3mins within a good session, then build up to 4mins. 5mins takes a while with >5mins being a significant barrier for many (me included...5:06 is my best...a while back now!)

    Some people can just do 6-7mins+ with little to no warm up...not many though!
     
  4. Andyblue

    Andyblue Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Melbourne Australia
    159
    0
    0
    Is needing to take a breath before say 3 mins just all in the head? Is it training to get used to the pain or training so there is no pain?
     
  5. stoyleg

    stoyleg Angel Fish

    # of Dives:
    Location: UK
    12
    0
    0
    bit of both really - the more training you do the longer it'll take before the 'pain' or rather contractions begin (if that's what you mean by 'pain'), but the more you do the more accustomed you'll get to the feeling and realise you can push beyond the point where you feel you need to breathe. It's just about practise and slow progression.

    It's worth getting Umberto Pelizzari's book (Amazon.com: Manual of Freediving: Underwater on a Single Breath (9781928649274): Umberto Pelizzari, Stefano Tovaglieri: Gateway) - there's a lot of useful techniques described in there.
     
  6. Andyblue

    Andyblue Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Melbourne Australia
    159
    0
    0
    Thank you for this usefull post. I'm on my Iphone however will push the thanks button when I jump on the pc.
     
  7. richdrogpa

    richdrogpa Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: WNY/US
    48
    11
    8
    These are the best explanations/sources I was able to find:

    http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/4299753-post4.html
    Freediving Explained - How to Freedive Manual: Training - Static Tables

    Hope it helps:)

    I personally was able to "couch-hold" my breath for about 1:20 min w/o any prep for the first time. The same day, after completing the CO2/O2 tables, I held it easily for 2:30 minutes... Although I read not to practice both tables on the same day...
     
  8. madprops

    madprops Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: vancouver canada
    70
    0
    6
    thats right just one a day tops and i would say no more then 5 a week take at lest two rest days this is what i do.
    co2-co2 rest o2-o2-co2 rest. you can switch up your rest days if you like or what tables you do on what day but try and rest at lest two days.
     
  9. madprops

    madprops Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: vancouver canada
    70
    0
    6
    are you talking like once you dive down you can stay down for 1:20 when swimming around? or just a static hold doing nothing?

    tell me everything you do on your 1:20 dive or hold. when you do this i will be able to help you
     
  10. daniel1948

    daniel1948 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Spokane, WA
    439
    58
    28
    There's an iPhone app called Breath Hold that will take you through O2 and CO2 tables. Obviously, the app is for dry-land training unless you have a waterproof case for your phone. :cool2: The best thing you could do would be to take a class from Performance Freediving. I just finished their class and it was amazing. In addition to breath training, you'll learn diving physiology, you'll learn how to be a safer diver, and a world of related information. You'll learn WHY you get that urge to breathe, and exercises you can do to delay the urge.
     

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