• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

cave diving vs flooded mine diving

Discussion in 'Cave Diving' started by Into the Water, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. Into the Water

    Into the Water DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Sweden, Värmland
    25
    11
    3
    Hi
    I'm really looking forward and shaking from excitement for registering myself for a cave course.
    I have one question regarding cave diving: are there any difference in diving cave or old flooded mine? What is best option for course to be conducted in? real natural caves or in artificial caves (old industrial mines) regarding to learning experience? or it doesn't really matter, all depence from cave instructor?

    From logistics point of view: usually diving in old mines are more organized with mini diving center inside, compressor, gas tanks, renting gear, safety equipment, easier access.... so far I know
     
  2. Jack Hammer

    Jack Hammer Solo Diver

    1,759
    1,098
    113
    The course should be conducted in multiple systems and environments. The more variety you dive the more experience you'll gain. Caves can be very different from each other and not all systems are the same. Learning to read caves and dive in flow is important. Mines have there own considerations as they are man made. There are important and different things to learn about those too.
     
  3. rjack321

    rjack321 Captain

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
    9,335
    3,314
    113
    Realizing you are in Sweden with established diving centers in mines makes for convenient logistics. At the intro cave level its not quite as critical but caves and mines are very different environments. If you take intro cave in a mine be sure to take full cave in actual caves. I would not recommend taking full cave in a mine
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017
  4. Germie

    Germie Cave Instructor

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Netherlands
    593
    448
    63
    You cannot do a full cave course in only mines. Then it is a mine diver course.
    The mine diver is a little bit less than a cave diver course. I would go for cave diver. In real caves. Then you can dive mines too.
     
    rjack321 likes this.
  5. Into the Water

    Into the Water DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Sweden, Värmland
    25
    11
    3
    What is main factor for that? because natural caves have more advanced and complex navigation and there usually no cave map?
     
  6. bamafan

    bamafan Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Panama City Beach, Fl.
    984
    468
    63
    Mines often have hazardous chemicals in the water. Caves you just have to worry about the occasional alligator or crocodile with a few Water Moccasins thrown in the mix in Florida.
     
    Into the Water likes this.
  7. kensuf

    kensuf Cave Instructor

    2,100
    2,790
    113
    Chemicals. Debris. Collapses. Sheesh.
     
  8. PfcAJ

    PfcAJ Orca

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: St Petersburg, Fl
    7,580
    6,278
    113
    Sounds like cathedral Falmouth now that the pipeline is underway.
     
  9. Nirvana

    Nirvana DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    297
    150
    43
    I have done several dozen dives in a flooded mine here in Brazil (Mina da Passagem). In this particular system, water contamination is not something we have to worry about. Cave collapse is also not a significant danger, although there are some sections of the mine that have been sealed off due to unstable conditions of the ceiling.

    For me, the greatest difference between diving in a mine and in a natural cave is the general layout of the cave. In Mina da Passagem, for instance, the tunnels are all considerably narrow, between 1.5m and 3m in width. Additionally, there are no rock formations along the way, only the ocasional staircase or collapsed wooden bridge.

    The natural caves I've been in, in Mexico and Florida, have much more diversity in the layout of the tunnels. There are narrow tunnels and there are tunnels wide enough to be impossible, even in good visibility, to see any of the sides while swimming in the middle. It makes it more critical to be mindful of the line. Also, there are more ups and downs, columns and boulders along the way. There is also the possibility of encountering a halocline or sulfur cloud, in addition to the silt that may be found in a mine.

    Finally, I found diving in strong flow, particularly handling a reel, to be a significant additional difficulty, when first diving a high flow system.

    All in all, while you can practice most skills in a flooded mine, I think it is very important to get some experience in natural caves during training.
     
  10. kensuf

    kensuf Cave Instructor

    2,100
    2,790
    113
    Was that a deep flooded mine?
     
    Danseur likes this.

Share This Page