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Commercial Divers spin off from A&I

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by Darol, Nov 13, 2019.

  1. Shasta_man

    Shasta_man Loggerhead Turtle

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    Between your avocation, this thread and your avatar description, I'm noticing a trend of interest in holes there Superlyte. :).
     
  2. Glenn Williams

    Glenn Williams Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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    Any LOTO, That is done with The folks in that area is a joke. Won’t say the name someone already did. Instead of locks they use tywraps and cards. So in essence if the operator decides to use a piece of equipment that is supposed to locked out, I always think of the meme “is it really though”?
     
  3. PBcatfish

    PBcatfish Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Florida
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    TyWraps are legal for LOTO as long as they require 40 pounds or more to break them.

    The official OSHA guidelines on LOTO procedures do not fit well into all industrial activities. Sometimes it is necessary to use modified procedures.
     
  4. pauldw

    pauldw Solo Diver

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    Do you have three eyes?
     
    BlueTrin and infieldg like this.
  5. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,681
    7,040
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    Watching too much Simpsons?


    Bob
     
  6. pauldw

    pauldw Solo Diver

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    Science is science, and there was a three eyed fish outside of Mr. Burns's power plant.
     
    Hoyden likes this.
  7. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,681
    7,040
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    Well, that's as good as the evening news to me!


    Bob
     
    John C. Ratliff likes this.
  8. Superlyte27

    Superlyte27 Cave Instructor

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Florida
    3,654
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    Lol
     
  9. Rich Keller

    Rich Keller Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Long Island NY
    3,360
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    I used my own lock out procedure. I didn't depend on tie wraps or their locks I used my own locks. Either my tender had the keys or if I was working alone I would take the keys down with me.
     
  10. EFX

    EFX Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: North Central Florida
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    Your description of this near miss reads like you depended on the company to lock out the equipment. In the steel mill I worked in this would be a safety violation. All vendors were required to use their own locks that were either stamped with their name or had ID tags attached to the locks. They were required to place their own lock on the switch. The plants electricians would pull the switch for them. They were also responsible to notify the operators to try the equipment out to verify that all potential energy sources were de-energized and the equipment would not operate. If a safety lock could not fit on the switch (ex. 120 VAC breakers), lock out tags were used. All safety locks required only one key and that key had to be in possession of the person performing the work. In the case of multiple people working on the same equipment then plant locks were used to lock out the equipment; the keys went into a lock box and the lock box was secured with the workers own safety locks. Never assume someone else has the equipment locked out -- lock it out yourself -- it's your life. If anyone tells you differently refuse to do the job until safe job procedures are in place.
     

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