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"Controlled" Buoyant Lift

Discussion in 'New Divers and Those Considering Diving' started by jw2013, Apr 28, 2014.

  1. Edward3c

    Edward3c Instructor, Scuba

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    Hickdive is spot on about starting the lift neutrally buoyant. The Instructor Manual reminds instructors NOT to teach the dumping of air, because of the problems it causes.

    Your instructor should be taking you through mini CBL, then a CBL

    On the lift don't wait until you feel any acceleration to start dumping; once upward movement starts you can release small amounts of gas to control the ascend. Remember the objective is to recover an unconscious diver without injury to yourself.

    Welcome to the wonderful of diving, there are amassing things to see and do.
     
  2. Hickdive

    Hickdive Solo Diver

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    I'm sorry but I'm not sure I understand this.

    Are you, a single rescuer bringing multiple casualties to the surface on a single lift?

    Are you being asked to make any lift without your mask on?
     
  3. jw2013

    jw2013 Angel Fish

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    Yes. A single diver lifting multiple casualties (pool only - 1:1 lift in open water). Once without a mask. The idea was to demonstrate using other 'signs' when lifting instead of focusing on visual references only. Things like touch, buoyancy, motion and ears.

    When lifting multiple divers at once I found the BCD air control had to be more IN control or I'd lose the control element far quicker. I found it really useful!

    Sent from my XT1032 using Tapatalk
     
  4. Hickdive

    Hickdive Solo Diver

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    I cannot imagine how one diver performs a controlled buoyant lift on more than one casualty on a single lift; perhaps you could describe the procedure for me?

    Is the mask off lift a requirement of being issued with the Ocean Diver qualification in your club?
     
  5. jw2013

    jw2013 Angel Fish

    # of Dives:
    Location: England
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    We would be taught:
    Casualty 1, approach them, take they inflater hose and establish a secure grip on their BCD with the same hand and gently inflate with a little air until they're neutrally buoyant then move them off toward Casualty 2 where you would again take the inflater hose, establish a secure grip and repeat the process of getting them to a neutrally buoyant state. Reaffirm the grips and the hand positions on the inflater hoses and inflate each BCD to begin the lift, dumping/adding air as needed. When at the surface, fully inflate both BCD's and then inflate your own.



    No. We are taught mask clearing and swimming without a mask, but they often ask (but never force) pupils to perform other skills without a mask to build their confidence and abilities in case the worst should happen outside the safety of the pool environment.

    I have to say, when they ask for the mask to come off for something, I don't hesitate because I've done it so many time under so many situations and conditions.
     
  6. Edward3c

    Edward3c Instructor, Scuba

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    The more I read this thread the more ridicules it gets. The point of the CBL is to get a casualty to the surface where additional medical assistance is available. Teaching anything that diminishes an automatic response in getting the casualty to the surface, is in my opinion flawed.


    its an unfortunate fact that in an emergency divers do what they were trained. A dived died recently because the rescuer shouted "PIZZA" and those around thought it was a training exercise and did nothing.
     
  7. flots am

    flots am Solo Diver

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    I'm guessing that they expect you to be neutral when starting this, so you only need to make your "victim" neutral at depth. On the way up, if you or the victim is becoming too buoyant, you may need to dump a little air. Physics is what it is. If you're going up too fast it's because you and or the victim(s) are too buoyant.

    That said, I can't imagine how an OW diver would need to (or could) effectively rescue more than one diver at the same time, or why they would even teach it as a skill or test it as a requirement.

    Successfully rescuing one person requires 100% attention from the rescuer and most require it from more than one person. While it might be fun in class, I've been involved in a couple of actual rescues, and can tell you that even with a lot of training, if I had to handle two simultaneous actual emergencies, someone is probably going to not be happy with the results.
     
  8. Hickdive

    Hickdive Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
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    And you're doing Ocean Diver;

    Facepalm.jpg

    Tell me, is the earth flat and Queen Victoria still on the throne where you are?
     

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