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Diving a Dry Suit

Discussion in 'DIR' started by ScubaFeenD, Apr 5, 2011.

  1. ScubaFeenD

    ScubaFeenD Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Baltimore, MD
    1,573
    97
    I just got my brand new DUI FLX this past week, and dove it last weekend. Overall I found the switch from wetsuit to drysuit to be pretty easy. I really like how easy it is to stay in one place in the water column--I dont budge at all while breathing like I did with a wetsuit, which will probably let my breath control that Ive developed diving wet go to crap.

    Anyway, its super sweet to dive dry.

    Now I have a few questions. I noticed while doing ascents that it isnt nearly as easy to stay in 0 degree trim while doing it. I realize that I just need some practice, but I am hoping some of you can offer some advice or suggestions. I am looking for gas dumping tips that would allow me to stay in trim while dumping the right amount of gas. How often should i plan on dumping from my suit, how to shift the bubble, and what should i likely be feeling in my suit to know its time to dump. Please keep in mind that I typically put enough air in my suit to prevent squeeze, and then put a bit of air in my wing, which usually is achieved by 2 second squirt of air in suit followed by 1 second squirt of air in wing every 10ft during descent--with that strategy I am perfectly situated at depth.

    Different perspectives are very welcome, as I will likely take what I read here and try to apply the most applicable advice.

    thanks
    Tim
     
  2. ucfdiver

    ucfdiver DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Orlando, FL
    3,338
    501
    You lose more style points going to a decompression chamber because you blew your ascent than you do staying in trim :D

    Sarcasm aside, I've found that sometimes you've just got to invert some to dump gas out of your legs. Ideally you don't want to let it get that bad (and over time it won't), but don't be afraid to just dump sometimes. What works well is to rotate your horizontal axis so that the shoulder side is up, raise your dump valve arm so all the air goes in the arm, then lower it allowing all the gas to vent while lowering.
     
    kathydee, ScubaFeenD and rjack321 like this.
  3. ScubaFeenD

    ScubaFeenD Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Baltimore, MD
    1,573
    97
    HAHA, trust me, there were def some times this last weekend when broke trim :shocked2: to vent, but I didnt blow any stops and i didnt need to grab onto anything (which i see as a positive :) )

    That seems like a great recommendation; I will be sure to try it.
     
  4. limeyx

    limeyx DIR Practitioner

    3,054
    46
    You almost certainly cannot stay in 100% trim as you need to make the valve "high" compared to the rest of the suit.

    Unless in a cave or wreck I really don't even attempt to. You can kind of do it by tilting to the (right) side a little, but it's harder to get the gas out and you may need to dump the wing more (this is how i do it in enclosed spaces when I dont want to bong the floor or ceiling)

    Generally I dont like too much gas in the suit, so I dump it all on ascent as soon as I feel it start to bubble up. Some people are more tolerant of gas in the suit --- find what works really.
     
  5. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington State
    11,260
    6,056
    Are you diving singles or doubles?
    What kind of undergarment are you using?
    Where is the dump valve on the suit?

    Last thing, is not a question... This whole zero degrees on ascent while simultaneously dumping is just not necessary. Depending on where your suit's dump valve is located, something will need to move (arm, shoulder, other).
     
    ScubaFeenD likes this.
  6. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington State
    11,260
    6,056
    Shiver all you want dude, I am holding onto that suit gas until I have to dump it! (at least around here)
     
    gsk3 likes this.
  7. ScubaFeenD

    ScubaFeenD Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Baltimore, MD
    1,573
    97
    I usually dive doubles, but dont plan on being "doubles exclusive" ( i still have my singles rig and love diving singles too)

    I was using 4th Element Artic Socks, Arctic bottoms, Dry base +Arctic Top.

    Dump valve is on the left shoulder. It is the Apeks high profile dump valve.

    I know that zero degree trim is not necessary all the time, especially while learning the suit. BUT, I have seen it done and know it is possible, so I am just looking for some ideas to work with. I dont imagine it will come overnight though.

    I appreciate the inquiry though. I am still getting used to the variability that exists in dry suit diving, and its a good exercise to be reminded of that.
     
  8. limeyx

    limeyx DIR Practitioner

    3,054
    46
    Heh heh heh, yeah if I am cold I will obviously keep more in the suit. Around here i am usually too hot on ascent if I wear the thick undergarments.
     
  9. PfcAJ

    PfcAJ Contributor

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: St Petersburg, Fl
    7,970
    7,436
    You can extend your legs a bit to move some air to the torso/ arms area while maintaining a relatively flat position in the water. Just be mindful of silt/ coral/ critters below you if you do that.
     
    ScubaFeenD likes this.
  10. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington State
    11,260
    6,056
    Well for single tanks I just dive the suit and don't worry about the wing. Sure I "could" put 4lbs of lift in the wing and the rest in my suit slowly dumping the wing and ending up with it empty at the end of the dive etc. The reality is I am trying to holding onto as many thermal units as possible from the start so I just use my wing for buoyancy in single tanks.

    The 4th element stuff doesn't have a shell so it should vent as easy or easier than any other.

    Depending on where your dump valve is you can drop your legs a little and get the bubble up to your shoulder. Then level out and roll to the right about 10deg bringing the bubble up to the arm/shoulder. How much you have to roll is a function of the valve placement on your arm.

    The valve needs to be a little below the plane of your body so it doesn't vent willy nilly. The consequence is you need to roll a round a bit to work the bubble up to it. How much rolling tends to go down as you learn to manage the bubble better. To some extent that's just trial and error with any given suit/undies/body.
     
    Rainer likes this.

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