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Lampreys Spawning (Lampetra tridentate)

Discussion in 'Marine Life and Ecosystems' started by John C. Ratliff, Aug 13, 2017 at 3:09 AM.

  1. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
    2,375
    689
    113
    I am going to start this thread by posting my dive log from a 2011 dive in the Clackamas River. This will be a rather long post, but it explains the first dive in which I actually witnessed the Pacific lamprey spawning in our rivers. This spring I again witnessed this spawning event, and was able to video it on two dives. I'm going to post that video here below, but wanted this first sighting to be here too. Here it is:
    SeaRat
     
    Schwob likes this.
  2. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
    2,375
    689
    113
    I went back the following week, but with a big, bulky SLR camera and housing, was unable to reach the area of spawning activity due to the high current. I won't post my entire dive log here, but here are my observations and the special problems:

    More to come.

    SeaRat
     
  3. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
    2,375
    689
    113
    I have finally gotten this video produced. This is not meant to be a "razzle-dazzle" video, but rather a study of the behavior and the water conditions that the Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentate, experiences is it goes upstream, finds a suitable place and spawns. It is rather long, but incorporates parts of two different dives, and documents the spawning of the Pacific lamprey.

    Enjoy,

    SeaRat
    John C. Ratliff, BS, Zoology, Oregon State University 1975

     

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