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Looking to get into reg self-service.

Discussion in 'Repairing your own Gear' started by KG Diver, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. buddhasummer

    buddhasummer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location:
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    uncfnp and KG Diver like this.
  2. halocline

    halocline Solo Diver

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    You don't need two tanks, just check your IP with a full tank, then turn the valve off, and bump a purge a couple of times until the tank pressure reads low, then re-check your IP.
     
  3. buddhasummer

    buddhasummer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
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    I learnt that from you.
     
  4. KG Diver

    KG Diver Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: RVA
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    Haha, I like it! Thanks for the awesome tip. I'm still plugging through Harlow's book, dang work getting in the way of fun.

    Hopefully by the time we get back from Lil Cayman in August I'll be able to give it a go. These puppies are about at the 2 year mark give or take a couple months, curious how they look on the inside.
     
  5. spoolin01

    spoolin01 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: SF Bay Area, CA
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    I use a compressed air nozzle/blower a lot when servicing regs. Also brass pin punches, and snap-ring pliers. I haven't tried those particular picks, but I like the flat pick included in this set for various tasks. A bench vise with soft jaw inserts is handy, and a 12" crescent wrench works fine on yoke bolts if used carefully. Another much used tool: Dremel with various brass and fiber brush bits for cleaning nooks and crannies of parts, and various diameter bronze gun bore brushes chucked in a drill press for similar purposes.
     

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