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Some from So. California this past summer...

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by drrich2, Dec 26, 2016.

  1. Sam Miller III

    Sam Miller III Scuba Legend Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: CALIFORNIA: Where recreational diving began!
    4,865
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    The abalone is a California " Green Abalone" ~~ Haliotis fulgens ~~
    Abalones are identified by shape of shell, topography of the shell, number of holes, general color of shell, color of the flesh, color and size of lace

    They can also be isolated by depth, water temperature and location
    Southern California abalones are generally identified by depth , Blacks, greens, pinks and white ( aka Sorenson) and on occasion a "threaded abalone" which are found in deep water and generally small in size .

    The red abalone H. rufescens is generally located in cold water from Oregon to Baja California, but seldom seen in the channel islands area.

    SDM
     
    drrich2 likes this.
  2. laikabear

    laikabear Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Pasadena, CA
    254
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    [QUOTE="Trailboss123, post: 7859803, member: 450907" #7 is definitely not a Giant Sea Star. They have 24 arms and are found up north in the Pugent Sound. They are currently making a comeback after the virus die off the last 2 years. [/QUOTE]

    I don't think we (Trailboss and I) are talking about the same starfish. Giant Spined Star (Pisaster giganteus) does not have 24 arms. Although, you are right, it can get very large, up to 22" across. I have never seen a starfish that big.

    I too will defer to Max. I haven't been diving very long and learned most of the fish, invert, and algae ID from Reef Check. They taught us certain species but not others. It can be tough when you see something that looks like one that you know, but it might be something similar that you didn't learn. That is one of my biggest challenges in ID'ing local stuff.

    When I looked up Knobby Sea Star I found this. That can't be right.

    @MaxBottomtime , do you know the scientific name of that sea star? I tend to use the common names but I wonder if we are both identifying the same star with a different common name.

    Not trying to be contentious as I have little experience with ID; I just want to learn. :) Love your photos by the way.
     
  3. MaxBottomtime

    MaxBottomtime Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Torrance, CA
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    Fixed. We have so many species of rockfish on the West Coast that it's hard to keep up with them. Some only occur in certain places but some overlap. We don't get China rockfish in Palos Verdes but we also don't see many black and yellow except at Pt. Vicente. The Sunset looks almost identical to the vermilion but is in deeper water. I photographed that large Sunset rockfish on the UB88 in 190 feet. The vermilion was in 60.
    Some change appearance as they age. The juvenile Vermilion looks nothing like the adult.
    [​IMG]
    Juvenile Vermilion rockfish

    The juvenile treefish looks almost tropical compared to an adult.
    [​IMG]
    Adult treefish

    [​IMG]
    Juvenile treefish
     
    laikabear likes this.
  4. MaxBottomtime

    MaxBottomtime Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Torrance, CA
    8,804
    7,840
    113
  5. MaxBottomtime

    MaxBottomtime Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Torrance, CA
    8,804
    7,840
    113
  6. drbill

    drbill The Lorax for the Kelp Forest Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Santa Catalina Island, CA
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    Keep in mind that there are two different species of two-spot octopus in our waters. Generally hard to tell them apart from pictures.
     
    drrich2 likes this.
  7. MaxBottomtime

    MaxBottomtime Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Torrance, CA
    8,804
    7,840
    113
    I can tell them apart. One lives at the islands and one lives near the mainland. :)
    Other than that, I'd have to ask one if it's a bimaculoides or bimaculatus.
     

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