• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

SSI Accident management flowchart poorly designed

Discussion in 'SSI: Scuba Schools International' started by franciscogalarza, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. franciscogalarza

    franciscogalarza Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Sydney, Australia
    10
    5
    3
    Hi all,
    I'm writing this post hopping that someone from SSI will read it and take action.
    The SSI app has an accident management flowchart that tells you what to do in case of an accident, which is a great idea. However this flowchart is impossible to understand, give it a try:

    IMG_7879.PNG


    The first node has 3 outputs, one of which has no arrow, so it's hard to know what to do next. Besides that, the nodes are not intuitive at all. For example "Underwater Breathing?", what does that mean? what are we supposed to do there? Another node is "Always Serious", what is that? Then there is a list with symptoms and another list with position, neuro exam, oxygen, etc. What is that?

    I did the React Right and Diver Stress & Rescue courses with SSI and I have no idea how to read this chart. I pointed it out to my instructor and he wasn't able to read it either. Imagine trying to read it in a real emergency.

    This flow chart is super important in case of an accident and should be clear and easy so anyone can read it. I find it incredibly frustrating that SSI thinks that this is acceptable.

    Why is it that scuba diving institutions don't care about UX at all? Have a look at the mobile apps, desktop apps and websites of SSI, PADI and Suunto, they're all terrible!
     

    Attached Files:

    • p.png
      p.png
      File size:
      174.4 KB
      Views:
      31
  2. ChuckP

    ChuckP Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cozumel
    595
    409
    63
    They're saying to asses the victim, if you need CPR (to the left), do that right away otherwise if they are breathing, you begin your assessment (to the right).

    That appears to be something SSI copied from DAN.

    In an emergency, you'll not be whipping your phone out to search for some flowchart I'd assume........

    You always always asses the victim, check for breathing, if none, begin CPR (there's the complicated call first thing) otherwise begin figuring out what the problem is......
     
  3. franciscogalarza

    franciscogalarza Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Sydney, Australia
    10
    5
    3
    I disagree. In an emergency it's very easy to rush and forget about an important step. That's why airplane pilots follow similar flowcharts to troubleshoot incidents.
    Here's the DAN's version, you can see that it's much more cleaner and easier to follow: https://www.daneurope.org/c/documen...856-c50b-4761-b54f-d7f9426056bb&groupId=10103
     
  4. happy-diver

    happy-diver Skindiver Just feelin it ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: same ocean as you
    1,133
    669
    113
    go do a cpr course mate

    and I'll make sure your pilot is still flying the plane whilst looking at the flowchart

    here you go, Patient not breathing, so clear airway and start puffing and pumping

    or is there an app for that
     
    ChuckP likes this.
  5. franciscogalarza

    franciscogalarza Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Sydney, Australia
    10
    5
    3
    You are saying that SSI can get away with putting a poorly designed flowchart because we shouldn't use it anyways. So why is it there? Do it right or don't do it.
    That's in line with my point that the scuba industry don't think about UX at all.
     
    Landau likes this.
  6. franciscogalarza

    franciscogalarza Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Sydney, Australia
    10
    5
    3
    I did one, provided by SSI. I still can't read the chart.
     
    Landau and RyanT like this.
  7. Jeremy Williams

    Jeremy Williams Nassau Grouper

    156
    75
    28
  8. ChuckP

    ChuckP Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cozumel
    595
    409
    63
    What is UX?

    The chart is clearly a learning tool. We don't use charts in emergency situations......

    I explained it above..........
     
  9. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New York City
    6,240
    5,674
    113
    Gotta say, that flowchart is poorly designed, in too many ways to count.

    I can't even figure out the path from the entry point. From the first node there are two arrows and one line with no arrows, and no conditionals ("yes" or "no"). What are you supposed to do? What path do you follow?

    What do the boxes with the symptoms mean? Are they things that the author wants you to check? How does that affect the flowchart? Are you supposed to continue "treatment" whether they improve or not? What "treatment"?

    For the node with "mild symptoms" they have "yes" and "no". Does "no" mean severe symptoms or no symptoms?

    So, I agree with the OP. Bad chart, reflects poorly on the agency.
     
  10. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,371
    6,401
    113
    Another agency flowchart below. I have one on a slate which also has a form for recording accident victim information on the reverse. Having one with my gear takes little room and may remind me to document the incident as well as a reminder of procedure.

    A good flowchart is a plus, however without having more information than a simple chart can hold, it is more a reminder than a handbook. That being said, SSI might try another revision.

    PADI Accident Management Workslate



    Bob
     

Share This Page