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Why Did My Nose Bleed After Dives?

Discussion in 'Diving Medicine' started by cleung, May 21, 2020.

  1. cleung

    cleung Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Mississauga, Canada
    722
    67
    28
    I did a liveaboard trip in the Galapagos last fall and many of the dives were around 80 to 90 feet with the odd one around 100 feet. By midweek, one divemaster noticed that after I came back on the boat, there was some blood in my mask in the nose area. I had to blow my nose overboard into the ocean but after that there was no more bleeding from my nose. This happened almost on a semi regular basis for the rest of the trip especially after a deeper dive.

    Why was this happening and is there anything I could do about it?
     
    wnissen likes this.
  2. wnissen

    wnissen Barracuda

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Livermore, Calif.
    286
    138
    43
    I don't know but it happens regularly to me. Definitely the severity is correlated loosely with depth. Curious to see what responses you get.
     
  3. Divehead

    Divehead Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Bonaire
    17
    16
    3
    Could be anything. From severe, to nothing. Problems with equalising, just a small artery in your nose that keeps starting to bleed because of you squeezing your nose.

    No-one can tell without looking into it
     
    lexvil likes this.
  4. lowflyer

    lowflyer Divemaster ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: SW
    414
    311
    63
    Most likely due to sinus barotrauma due to equalization issues. Descending without equalization makes for leakage of bloody fluid from sinus membranes into the sinuses. Then on ascent expanding gas forces the bloody fluid into the nose.
     
  5. scubadada

    scubadada Diver Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Philadelphia and Boynton Beach
    12,036
    7,817
    113
    OK, maybe it's a tumor, No, it's not a toomah
     
  6. cleung

    cleung Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Mississauga, Canada
    722
    67
    28
    Well I probably over equalize during my dives since I don't want to wait until I feel it in my ears. But maybe equalizing too hard each time might be an issue?
     
  7. lowflyer

    lowflyer Divemaster ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: SW
    414
    311
    63
    You are probably judging your equalization by how your ears feel. That may not reflect how your sinuses are doing. Maybe @doctormike can chime in for a more expert explanation.

    And yes, it is possible to improperly do it or overdo it
     
    EireDiver606 likes this.
  8. M-Cameron

    M-Cameron Nassau Grouper

    142
    204
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    honestly it could be anything......sinus infection, trauma from sinus squeeze, popped a vessel equalizing, hell even the weather.

    ide keep an eye on it and maybe run it by your doctor when you have a chance......but if it was me, i wouldnt be terribly concerned based on what you are describing.
     
  9. Ukmc

    Ukmc ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

    148
    93
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    It could be anything, if you are concerned, you will need to have it checked out by a medical professional.
    The most common reason for nose bleeds above the water is dry air. You get a lot of dry air diving, especially if you are doing several consecutive dives. Vaseline helps with that. However, while this is the most likely cause, you need a medical professional, preferably an otolaryngologist to do an exam to rule out other causes, like septal deviations, perforations, tumors etc...
    Good luck.
     
  10. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    2,491
    2,097
    113
    Concur with @lowflyer 's assessment that this is most likely mild sinus barotrauma. It might be worth a visit to an ENT physician to help rule out anatomic obstruction, but I think that a toomah is pretty far down the differential.

    Best regards,
    DDM
     

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