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Bottles n' Crocks n' Pipes - Oh My!

Discussion in 'Underwater Treasures' started by DeepSeaDan, Dec 29, 2020.

  1. shoredivr

    shoredivr Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Ontario
    9,326
    10,473
    113
    For the last dive in a course I was taking years ago, the instructor had us dive on the burned out wreckage of an old and once famous hotel on Lake Rousseau. The lake is tannic, and though it is pitch black below 20 feet, the water below the thermocline is quite clear. Ideal for finishing some skills for a technical course.

    Built in the 1920s and frequented by Hollywood stars, Hotel Muskoka burned to the ground in 1954 or so. As they did in those days, the wreckage was bulldozed off the picturesque granite cliff and into the lake. The cliff continued 70 feet straight down under water, where it gradually levelled out at about 90 feet.

    The hotel wreckage was scattered between 70 and 90 feet. Old ornate metal bedsteads, charred wooden timbers, sheet metal eaves troughs, bits of pipes and so on stretched off into the distance as far as our lights could illuminate. It was vast, fascinating and a bit eerie.

    My instructor spotted the edge of a china plate poking up out of the rubble. He grabbed it, then signalled to begin the ascent. On the way up we did an exercise where after turning my wrist mounted dive computer over so the depth couldn’t be seen, I popped a lift bag with line marked every 10 feet, then he simulated being an unconscious diver and I had to bring him to the surface, controlling both of our buoyancies while sticking to a simulated deco schedule. He maintained a firm grasp on the plate as we successfully ascended.

    It wasn’t till we were back on the boat and not so busy with skills that I was able to see the plate. IlRC it was given to the appropriate staff of a modern hotel that’s now on the lake.

    It was certainly an interesting and unusual dive.

    C0FB887D-4590-4F89-BD37-007567959722.jpeg
     
  2. DeepSeaDan

    DeepSeaDan Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Ontario, Canada
    1,019
    170
    63
    You're very welcome! My pleasure.
     
    shoredivr likes this.
  3. shoredivr

    shoredivr Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Ontario
    9,326
    10,473
    113
    Here’s a little teapot from 170’ down in the St Lawrence River.


    BF0E84A6-E52A-4511-B3A9-84AF4BFF625C.jpeg
     
    mattherat and calabash digger like this.
  4. DeepSeaDan

    DeepSeaDan Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Ontario, Canada
    1,019
    170
    63
    It certainly was! That is one pile of refuse to dump in a lake; I would think there might be some nasty entanglement risks in the dump area.

    If I ever shuffle off the mortal coil while diving for treasure and was recovered from depth, I'd wager whatever I found on the dive will be firmly gripped in my hand!

    Thanks for the story!

    DSD
     
  5. DeepSeaDan

    DeepSeaDan Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Ontario, Canada
    1,019
    170
    63
    Landsakes!! That little beauty is mint! You have some fertile hunting grounds in the deeper depths of the river, as most "scroungers" are limited to recreational depths.

    I saw some torpedo & round-bottom bottles recovered by Warren Lo & his buddies, on a small wreck @ 145'. After 47 years of diving & tens of thousands of hours of exposure, I'm too leery of the deeper scuba depths - I've managed to dodge dcs this long, so tempting fate is not an option for me.

    Here's a pic of my favourite jug: C.L. Baker c.w. 1/4 gallon whiskey jug, circa 1860:

    IMG_5409.jpeg
     
    calabash digger and shoredivr like this.
  6. shoredivr

    shoredivr Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Ontario
    9,326
    10,473
    113
    Beautiful
     
    calabash digger likes this.
  7. WeRtheOcean

    WeRtheOcean Barracuda

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location:
    214
    107
    43
    And I see that next to it you have an electrical insulator.
     
  8. DeepSeaDan

    DeepSeaDan Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Ontario, Canada
    1,019
    170
    63
    Yes indeed. I've never found a rare insulator, but many of them have beautiful colour, so on the shelf they go!

    DSD
     
    calabash digger likes this.
  9. calabash digger

    calabash digger ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Calabash N.C.
    167
    141
    43
  10. calabash digger

    calabash digger ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Calabash N.C.
    167
    141
    43
    I know where a 70 ft hole is that a husband and wife team pulled 18 onion bottles out of. It has a 90 degree drop off cliff from 25 ft to 70 . It is also in a deep curve and the river as under cut the side wall and has basically made a small cave....needless to say I will not be diving it....I will leave the deeper depths and sketchy dives to others.....
     

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