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IANTD v TDI Advance Nitrox Material

Discussion in 'SDI/TDI/ERDI' started by MikadoWu, Apr 2, 2020.

  1. MikadoWu

    MikadoWu Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    303
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    Can anyone give an honest rating between the IANTD and the TDI Advance Nitrox Material?

    Thanks,
     
  2. Superlyte27

    Superlyte27 Cave Instructor

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Florida
    3,875
    2,943
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    Do you like text books riddled with grammatical and typographical errors? Do you like Yoga and Feng Shui? If not, take the TDI course.
     
    rongoodman, BlueTrin, LandonL and 5 others like this.
  3. MikadoWu

    MikadoWu Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    303
    79
    28
    That Bad?
     
    BlueTrin and Caveeagle like this.
  4. Superlyte27

    Superlyte27 Cave Instructor

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Florida
    3,875
    2,943
    113
    About 10 years ago my daughter asked if she could become an open water diver. She was 10 at the time. I handed her the manual and told her that when she was done reading the book we'd start her class. 5 minutes in, she yelled from the other room, "Dad, did a five year old write this book? It's riddled with typos." I said, "No, a guy with a mail-in doctorate did".
     
    Lostdiver71 likes this.
  5. Lostdiver71

    Lostdiver71 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Jupiter, Florida, United States
    171
    112
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    Also IANTD barely exists, I have requested copies of my Tech certification cards from the 90's and have not gotten even a reply to my multiple emails!
     
  6. Larryjd1

    Larryjd1 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: In my crease or underwater in Northern California
    142
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    I have IANTD certifications, for no other reason than the instructor I wanted to use taught under it.

    @Lostdiver71 Can't say what will happen now with everyone sheltering, but earlier this year I found them very helpful when I called the Florida office regarding some training material and cert card issues. Here is the email for Luis who ended up helping me and was very responsive - luis@iantd.com
     
    evandroairton likes this.
  7. MikadoWu

    MikadoWu Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    303
    79
    28
    But how good do you believe their material is?
     
  8. rongoodman

    rongoodman ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Albany, NY
    5,217
    1,899
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    The instructor will be more important than either the book or the agency. My IANTD cave text was awful, but the instructors are Protec were great, so it didn't make any difference.
     
  9. tbone1004

    tbone1004 Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    17,108
    8,936
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    you shouldn't need any real books for advanced nitrox. You should already know all of the information from basic nitrox, the rest of the good stuff is in the USN diving manual and NOAA manuals. The simple fact is that Advanced Nitrox on its own is a BS course with not a whole lot of useful material in it. Quite literally the only "new" information vs. regular nitrox is that you have to have an O2 clean first stage. Literally everything else should have been taught to you at basic nitrox. CNS exposure, risks of high ppO2, and that's about it.

    Don't believe me? Read the S&P from TDI
    https://www.tdisdi.com/wp-content/uploads/files/sandp/currentYear/TDI/part 2/pdf/individual/TDI Diver Standards_07_Advanced_Nitrox_Diver.pdf

    Required subject areas.

    • Physiology
      • Hypoxia-pretty self explanatory, but there's no point in discussing hypoxia because you're talking about hyperoxic gases.
      • Oxtox-covered in nitrox
      • Nitrogen Narcosis-covered in basic OW
      • N2 absorption and elimination-it's not a deco procedures course, but you should have covered this in literally every scuba class you've taken, no new information
      • CO2 tox-not sure why that's in there, probably just a copy and paste to briefly cover, not unique to this course though
      • CO tox-same as CO2
    • Formulas
      • best mix/MOD-should know from regular nitrox
    • Equipment
      • considerations for >40%-this is actually new, but only sort of because your regular nitrox should have covered provisions for partial pressure blending for the tanks, so the only new thing is O2 cleaning the first stage, and no 2nd stages don't have to be O2 cleaned
    • Tables/Computers
      • nothing new from nitrox
    • Planning
      • nothing new from nitrox
    • Mixing procedures
      • covered in nitrox, but not really relevant because for Advanced Nitrox you are 99.999% going to have to pp blend
    • Deco
      • it's not a deco course, though you should combine with deco procedures

    So, there's nothing useful in the books that you shouldn't already have. Don't worry about the learning materials because if your regular nitrox class was taught properly, there literally should be 0 new information presented to you. If your regular nitrox class was not taught properly, then go read the NOAA diving manual. It is far more useful if you actually care about the physiology.

    This is rev5 for free download. No significant changes in Rev6, so all the good stuff is still relevant. Between this and the USN Diving Manual *free download from them too*, all of the information mentioned in the TDI standards, are available to you. They may not be compiled quite as cleanly as you'd get in a diving course where they've distilled it down to just what you need to know, but this is where all of that information comes from.
    http://tecvault.t101.ro/NOAA Diving Manual.pdf
    https://www.navsea.navy.mil/Portals...ING MANUAL_REV7.pdf?ver=2017-01-11-102354-393
     
  10. Efka76

    Efka76 Barracuda

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
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    I took PADI Nitrox course, which included basic nitrox information, however, in TDI Advanced nitrox course was much extensive and included more information. I do not know whether TDI Basic nitrox course is deeper than PADI Nitrox. Also, your suggestion to read NOAA manual seems a bit strange - this manual is maybe 1000 page long :)

    Regarding IANTD vs TDI.... honestly, everything depends on instructor. In OP place I would look for a reputable tech instructor who has passion for diving and relevant many year experience in tech diving. It is absolutely irrelevant what agency card will be issued to you. TDI, NAUI, IANTD, RAID..... all these organisations are well recognised worldwide. Also, even if you have TDI Advanced trimix card nobody will let you do 100 m dives without check dives where your skills will be evaluated. I understand that the same thing applies in wreck and cave diving. You are allowed to do such dives (where you are not known) only after check dives.
     

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